Top Ten Tuesday: Cover redesigns — love ’em or hate ’em?

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is Cover Redesigns I Loved/Hated — which at first I wasn’t going to do, but then I took another look at my shelves, and found last-minute inspiration! Here are a variety of books that have been redesigned over the years. You be the judge of whether it’s for better or worse!

And because I’m running late, my top 10 list is really a top 5 list this week. Short & sweet!

1. Wuthering Heights: This just makes me laugh. In the heat of Twilight mania, this classic was reissued and blurbed as Bella’s favorite book. I couldn’t help but feel sorry for the tweens who picked up a copy expecting vampires!

 

2. Stephen King books: I was always kind of partial to the cheesy early paperback editions of Stephen King’s books. The more streamlined graphic covers don’t have the same scare factor for me:

 

3. John Scalzi books: A few early Scalzi novels have been issued with new covers this past year. The new ones are nice, but you just can’t beat the whimsy of the earlier version.

4. Harry Potter: Okay, yes, the original is an absolute classic… but I do think Brian Selznick did a fantastic version with his set too.

5. Outlander: Some of the early covers in the series are so old-time cheesy, they just make me laugh!

How do you feel about cover redesigns? Are there any that you particularly love or hate?

If you wrote a TTT post this week, please share your link!

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Cover Cousins #3

Everyone once in a while, a book cover will call to mind another for me… and when that happens, I think of them as Cover Cousins.

Here’s how I framed the concept for my first Cover Cousins post:

I love when I pick up a new book and am instantly reminded of another — not necessarily because the covers are the same, but more because there’s a common feeling to them, a style, a color pattern, an image. The connection may only be in my mind, but it’s something I really enjoy thinking about.

Here’s my newest set of Cover Cousins — first, a book that I read last year and loved:

girl with all the gifts

And now, two books whose covers immediately made me think of The Girl With All the Gifts:

The three books are all quite different when it comes to genre and content… but those yellow covers with a single, representational figure!

What do you think?

Cover Cousins #2

Everyone once in a while, a book cover will call to mind another for me… and when that happens, I think of them as Cover Cousins.

Here’s how I framed the concept for my first Cover Cousins post:

I love when I pick up a new book and am instantly reminded of another — not necessarily because the covers are the same, but more because there’s a common feeling to them, a style, a color pattern, an image. The connection may only be in my mind, but it’s something I really enjoy thinking about.

Here’s my newest set of Cover Cousins:

 

These two are quite different, but between the title fonts and the overall layout, including the flowers and plants around the edges, seeing Vengeance Road immediately made me thing of The Darkest Part of the Forest.

What do you think? Do see a connection, or is it all in my mind?

Cover Cousins

I love when I pick up a new book and am instantly reminded of another — not necessarily because the covers are the same, but more because there’s a common feeling to them, a style, a color pattern, an image. The connection may only be in my mind, but it’s something I really enjoy thinking about. So… I thought I’d create a feature to highlight great book cover pairs whenever I happen to stumble across them.

To kick things off, here’s my first set of Cover Cousins:

5 to 1

White Cat

 

They’re not identical or anything, but there’s something about the look — the black background, the stylized graphic, the color scheme — that makes me want to put these two together.

Pretty cool covers, aren’t they?

Cover Cousins is a just a goofy little diversion of mine… but I like it. I’ll be back with more cover match-ups from time to time!

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Book Covers I’d Frame As Pieces of Art

fireworks2

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is Top Ten Book Covers I’d Frame As Pieces of Art. I’ve done other top 10 lists with favorite covers (and even one with scary covers) — so I’ll try to come up with 10 “work of art” book covers without repeating myself… too much.

1) The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker

golem

2) Mokoka’i by Alan Brennert

molokai

3) Impossible by Nancy Werlin

impossible

4) The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman

dovekeepers

5) Sacré Bleu by Christopher Moore

sacre bleu

6) Meet Me in the Moon Room by Ray Vukcevich
(I haven’t read the book, but I do love the cover!)

meet me

7) The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien (original edition with Tolkien’s cover art)

hobbit

8) Any of the new series of covers for Susanna Kearsley books, especially:

 9) The covers from any of the Fables series volumes, especially:

10) The Brides of Rollrock Island by Margo Lanagan
(Two different covers, and I like them both!)

If you want to see one of my earlier posts about favorite covers, check it out here. (Only 2 repeats! Not bad…)

What’s on your list this week? Share your links, and I’ll come check out your top 10!

If you enjoyed this post, please consider following Bookshelf Fantasies! And don’t forget to check out our regular weekly features, Thursday Quotables and Flashback Friday. Happy reading!

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Do you host a book blog meme? Do you participate in a meme that you really, really love? I’m building a Book Blog Meme Directory, and need your help! If you know of a great meme to include — or if you host one yourself — please drop me a note on my Contact page and I’ll be sure to add your info!

 

What’s black and red and read all over?

Some of the most striking book covers on my shelves, that’s what.

There’s something about that black and red combination that is so sharp and so eye-catching — maybe that’s why we’re seeing more and more of the black and red look in bookstores these days. I suppose you could credit this one for really popularizing the color combo:

This is not a Twilight post! I’m talking about the color scheme here.

Then publishers decided to Twilight-ify some of the classics, as if adding shiny black and red covers would suddenly make teens salivate over Emily Bronte:

Let’s ignore the “Bella & Edward’s favorite book” caption at upper right, shall we?

They’ve even done it to Austen:

“The Love That Started It All”. Please…

Well, I do have to admit that the black and red look is quite catchy… and perhaps a bit sinister. Does this version imply that there will be blood in Pride & Prejudice? (Gotta love that ampersand, by the way.) Teens who pick this one up expecting sparkles and red eyes may be a tad disappointed.

As I was reshelving books this past week, I pulled out some of my favorite red and black covers from my own collection. Excuse the shoddy camera work — that just proves that these are really mine. Here are some from my shelves that I think are most effective:

Replay by Ken Grimwood

A wonderful, awful, disturbing book of timey-wimey weirdness, as a man replays his life over and over again. If you had the ability to change your life, would you? The black and red cover with the repeating half-photo gives me a bit of the chills.

Sisters Red by Jackson Pearce

This YA book is a retelling of Little Red Riding Hood, with a Buffy-style heroine who kicks butt, brings down the monsters, and tries to make a better life for her sister.

Restless by William Boyd

I will admit to not having read Restless, but it sounds fascinating — and I do like the cover. Stark and a bit mysterious.

Bones of the Moon by Jonathan Carroll

Such an odd book, mind-bending at times. I’m still not sure whether it worked for me, but one thing’s certain — I do love the cover.

The Radleys, a genre-defying story of vampires living in the suburbs, got a comic-esque cover aimed toward the YA audience in the UK (above), but I actually prefer the US version, which conveys more of a sense of something sinister lurking behind the domestic facade:

The Radleys, with the US version, marketed as adult fiction

Sadly, my more camera was not up to completing its task, so although this book lives on my shelves, I could not get a decent picture of it and had to resort to importing an online version:

The Monsters of Templeton by Lauren Groff

This story of dark secrets in a small town is well-served by the sharp cover art that combines a gothic feel with modern images.

Another that I’ve read, but only as an e-book:

When She Woke by Hillary Jordan

This modern retelling of The Scarlet Letter is hauntingly well-done, and I really love the sharpness of the cover portrait.

Finally, I just came across this image of new editions of classic works by Stephen King:

I think I’ll be dreaming about these tonight. Wouldn’t they look terrific on my shelves?

That’s all I’ve got. How about you? What black and red beauties have caught your eye lately?