Top Ten Tuesday: Books that make me hungry!

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is Books that make me hungry.

Yum. I’m not a foodie, but I do love to eat — and I love it when books I’m reading feature delicious-sounding food.

My top ten picks:

1. To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han: Lara Jean is always baking, and I want to try everything!

2. The Chocolate Thief by Laura Florand: I didn’t love the book all that much, but the artisan chocolates sounded amazing.

3. Chocolat by Joanne Harris: How can I not love a book about a chocolaterie?

4. Like Water for Chocolate: Are we detecting a theme yet?

5. All These Things I’ve Done by Gabrielle Zevin: Okay, one more chocolate book! This story is set in a world where chocolate and caffeine are illegal, but there’s enough black market chocolate around to make me crave it really badly.

6. Recipe for Persuasion by Sonali Dev: The story takes place at a reality show cooking competition, and every single dish sounds amazing!

7. The Hundred-Foot Journey by Richard C. Morais: The story of a chef’s quest to establish a gourmet Indian fusion restaurant in France is full of absolutely mouth-watering descriptions of the food.

8. The Mercy Thompson series by Patricia Briggs: In times of stress, Mercy bakes… and since she’s always in the middle of some supernatural conflict or dangerous adventure, there are chocolate chip cookies and snickerdoodles galore.

9. Outlander Kitchen by Theresa Carle-Sanders: A non-fiction choice, this is actually a cookbook. If you knew me IRL, you’d think this was hilarious, since I absolutely don’t cook. So why do I have this book? Because it’s Outlander, and it’s so pretty! I really enjoy looking at all the Outlander-themed food, even if I’ll never try the recipes.

10. Meet Me at the Cupcake Cafe by Jenny Colgan: There are so many Jenny Colgan books I could include here, especially since she kindly includes recipes in her food-themed books. I love this one especially because I have such a sweet tooth for baked goods, and the cupcakes in this book all sound amazing.

 

 

What’s on your TTT list this week? Please share your links!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Books that should be adapted into Netflix shows or movies

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is Books that Should be Adapted into Netflix Shows/Movies.

Two of the types of watching I like to do on Netflix are (1) scifi/fantasy series and (2) light and fluffy romantic movies. Yes, these are really completely different, but each takes me away from the day-to-day and lets me become immersed in other worlds or other people’s lives. And who doesn’t need that right now?

My top ten picks:

First, to be made into one or more seasons of a series:

1. The Folk of the Air series by Holly Black: The story of mortals being raised in Faerie and rising to power by their wits could be so excellent as a series! I’d love to see the scenery, the magical elements, and the characters themselves.

2. The Finishing School series by Gail Carriger: Can you imagine how awesome this would be as an ongoing series? Maybe one season per book? The characters, the costumes, the dirigibles — I need this in my life!

3. InCryptids by Seanan McGuire: I think this could have a little bit of a Grimm or Supernatural vibe, but a little more light-hearted. A big extended family of cryptozoologists dealing with scary enemies and all sorts of entertaining otherworldly beings. All this, plus ballroom dancing!

4. Wanderers by Chuck Wendig: Well, now probably isn’t the best time for a series about a pandemic wiping out humanity — but I loved this book, and could see the story working as a 10-part series.

5. The Beauty (graphic novels) by Jeremy Haun: Again, a story about a virus maybe isn’t a great choice — but it would be very cool to see this story about beauty being a sexually transmitted disease brought to life. It’s weird and dark, but I think it could work!

6. Old Man’s War by John Scalzi: The concept is so fantastic, and don’t we need another great space battle saga in our lives?

Next, a bunch of sweet books that would make great rom-com movies:

7. Well Met by Jen DeLuca: Romance at the Ren Faire! And since there are two more books on the way, if the first movie was a success, there’s material for more.

8. The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary: The basic concept of two people sharing an apartment but never meeting is just so cute. I’d love to see it on my screen. I bet it would be hilarious to watch.

9. The Bookshop on the Shore by Jenny Colgan: Any of the three books in this loosely connected series would be great, but this one is my favorite. Between selling books out of a van, finding true love in the Highlands, and dealing with a strange but endearing family, I think it could be a hit! And like with Well Met, there are more books, so more related plots to spin off!

And finally, a book that I think would make a terrifying movie:

10. Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia: The clothes! The setting! The creepy house and the weird people there! It’s just begging to be made into a film.

**Updated to add: Wishes do come true! Hulu is developing Mexican Gothic as a series! Woo hoo! Read about it, here.**

 

What’s on your TTT list this week? Please share your links!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Loved but Never Reviewed

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is Books I Loved but Never Reviewed.

Between my blog and Goodreads, most of my more recent reads got at least a short review. So, for this topic, I mostly went back to books I read in my pre-blogging days… or books that I loved so much or that are so universally adored that there didn’t seem to be much point in writing a review (other than the old short stand-by: “I loved it!).

  1. Outlander by Diana Gabaldon (yes, really– for all that I talk about this book on my blog, I’ve never written an actual review)
  2. Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery
  3. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
  4. 11/22/63 by Stephen King
  5. March trilogy by John Lewis
  6. Blue Asylum by Kathy Hepinstall
  7. Sunshine by Robin McKinley
  8. Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn
  9. The Samurai’s Garden by Gail Tsukiyama
  10. Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

What books are on your TTT this week? Please share your links!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Books with Colors In the Titles (aka, I’ve got the Blues!)

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is Books with Colors In the Titles — what fun!

As I started looking at my shelves and my lists of books I’ve read, I definitely came away with a BLUE vibe… so here are ten sixteen*** books with Blue in their titles!

***Once I got started, it was hard to stop…

  1. Twice in a Blue Moon by Christina Lauren (review)
  2. Red, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston (review)
  3. Blue Asylum by Kathy Hepinstall (review)
  4. The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley
  5. Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell
  6. A Yellow Raft in Blue Water by Michael Dorris
  7. Blueberries for Sal by Robert McCloskey
  8. Coyote Blue by Christopher Moore
  9. Even Cowgirls Get the Blues by Tom Robbins
  10. Blue Diary by Alice Hoffman
  11. A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler (review)
  12. The Blue Salt Road by Joanne M. Harris (review)
  13. Girl in Hyacinth Blue by Susan Vreeland
  14. Blue Stars by Emily Gray Tedrowe (review)
  15. Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry
  16. Midnight Blue-Light Special by Seanan McGuire (review)

Did you do a color-themed TTT this week? Please share your links!

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Top Ten Tuesday: A TTT Freebie — 10 classics on my TBR list

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s is a freebie week, meaning we all come up with our own TTT topics.

I thought I’d return to an oldie but goodie — classic reads that I still need to get to. My list of to-read classics changes all the time, but for right now, these are the ten classics that I’d most like to read:

  1. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  2. Dracula by Bram Stoker (a re-read, but it’s been enough years that it’ll probably feel new to me)
  3. A Passage to India by E. M. Forster
  4. The Painted Veil by W. Somerset Maugham
  5. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  6. The Island of Dr. Moreau by H. G. Wells
  7. Peony by Pearl S. Buck
  8. Eight Cousins by Louisa May Alcott (or really, anything by this author besides the Little Women trilogy, which I’ve read)
  9. I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith
  10. Jamaica Inn by Daphne Du Maurier

After putting this list together, it occurs to me that it’s weighted toward male authors, which doesn’t make me happy — so this whole topic may need further thought! Or a follow-up post, at the very least.

Have you read any of these books, and if so, which do you recommend?

What did you write about for this week’s TTT? Please share your links!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Top ten Stephen King books I need to read

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is: Genre Freebie (pick a genre and build a list around it! i.e., best/worst romances, non-fiction for travelers, memoirs for foodies, classics that feel timeless, romance novel kisses, science fiction that feels too real for comfort, women’s fiction for newbies, etc.)

I was thinking about horror — fitting for these days, right? — and mind naturally went to Stephen King, and how even though I think of myself as having read a lot of his books, there are still plenty more to get to. So, without too much fuss or bother, I thought I’d share the ten Stephen King books that are highest on my Stephen King TBR list!

Note: While putting together this list, I realized that I’ve already read ALL of SK’s releases since 2009. Go, me! And I’m only include one Dark Tower book on my list, even though I actually have four from the series still to read. Because if I never get around to reading the next one (#4), why bother listing the ones that come later? I also realized that the reference list I was using for Stephen King books didn’t include his Richard Bachman books, so actually, there are even more SK works for me to get to! In any case, here are my ten priorities… for now.

1. The Dead Zone (1979)
2. Firestarter (1980)
3. Needful Things (1991)
4. Dolores Claiborne (1993)
5. The Dark Tower: Wizard and Glass (1997)
6. The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon (1999)
7. The Green Mile (2000)
8. Dreamcatcher (2001)
9. Lisey’s Story (2006)
10. Duma Key (2008)

If you’ve read any of the above –which one should I read first?

What’s your TTT topic this week? Share your links, and I’ll come check out your top 10!

Top Ten Tuesday: Ten ARCs for early 2020

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is a Freebie, so we each choose whatever topic we’d like I’m keeping it simple this time. I’ve decided to focus on 10 ARCs I have coming up to read and review in the first few months of 2020. I’m excited for all of these!

(Covers and synopses via Goodreads)

1. Welcome to the Pine Away Motel & Cabins by Katarina Bivald – release date 1/7/2020

What it’s about: A charming tale of the folks who reunite at a ramshackle roadside motel in Pine Creek, Oregon, after the unfortunate death of Henny, a local who worked at the cabins all her life, and who isn’t going to let a tiny thing like death stop her from living fully — not when her friends and her little town need her the most.

Why I want to read it: I loved Katarina Bivald’s first novel, The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend (review). This new book sounds just as sweet and quirky.

Release date: 1/7/2020

 

2. The Vanished Birds by Simon JImenez

What it’s about: Nia Imani is a woman out of place and outside of time. Decades of travel through the stars are condensed into mere months for her, though the years continue to march steadily onward for everyone she has ever known. Her friends and lovers have aged past her; all she has left is work. Alone and adrift, she lives only for the next paycheck, until the day she meets a mysterious boy, fallen from the sky.

Why I want to read it: Time travel and space travel and mysterious encounters… this definitely sounds like a book for me.

Release date: 1/14/2020

 

3. Race to the Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse 

What it’s about:Lately, seventh grader Nizhoni Begay has been able to detect monsters, like that man in the fancy suit who was in the bleachers at her basketball game. Turns out he’s Mr. Charles, her dad’s new boss at the oil and gas company, and he’s alarmingly interested in Nizhoni and her brother, Mac, their Navajo heritage, and the legend of the Hero Twins. Nizhoni knows he’s a threat, but her father won’t believe her.

When Dad disappears the next day, leaving behind a message that says “Run!”, the siblings and Nizhoni’s best friend, Davery, are thrust into a rescue mission that can only be accomplished with the help of Diné Holy People, all disguised as quirky characters. Their aid will come at a price: the kids must pass a series of trials in which it seems like nature itself is out to kill them. If Nizhoni, Mac, and Davery can reach the House of the Sun, they will be outfitted with what they need to defeat the ancient monsters Mr. Charles has unleashed. But it will take more than weapons for Nizhoni to become the hero she was destined to be . . .

Why I want to read it: I loved Rebecca Roanhorse’s The Sixth World books (and can’t wait for more!). This middle grade novel sounds like such fun, and I already know I love the author’s writing.

Release date: 1/14/2020

 

4. A Witch in Time by Constance Sayers

What it’s about:In 1895, sixteen-year-old Juliet LaCompte has a passionate, doomed romance with the married Parisian painter Auguste Marchant. When her mother — a witch — attempts to cast a curse on Marchant, she unwittingly summons a demon, binding her daughter to both the artist and this supernatural being for all time. Juliet is fated to re-live her affair and die tragically young lifetime after lifetime as the star-crossed lovers reincarnate through history. The demon — who appears to Juliet in all her reincarnations as a mysterious, handsome, and worldly benefactor-has been helplessly in love with her since 19th century France, even though she forgets him each time she dies. He falls for her in 1930s Hollywood, in 1970s Los Angeles, and finally in present-day Washington D.C. — where she begins to develop powers of her own. In this life, she starts to remember her tragic past lives. But this time, she might have the power to break the cycle…

Why I want to read it: More timey-wimey intrigue and romance! Sounds amazing.

Release date: 2/11/2020

 

5. Only Mostly Devastated by Sophie Gonzales

What it’s about: When Ollie meets his dream guy, Will, over summer break, he thinks he’s found his Happily Ever After. But once summer’s ended, Will stops texting him back, and Ollie finds himself one prince short of a fairytale ending. To complicate the fairytale further, a family emergency sees Ollie uprooted and enrolled at a new school across the country—Will’s school—where Ollie finds that the sweet, affectionate and comfortably queer guy he knew from summer isn’t the same one attending Collinswood High. This Will is a class clown, closeted—and, to be honest, a bit of a jerk.

Ollie has no intention of pining after a guy who clearly isn’t ready for a relationship. But as Will starts ‘coincidentally’ popping up in every area of Ollie’s life, from music class to the lunch table, Ollie finds his resolve weakening.

The last time he gave Will his heart, Will handed it back to him trampled and battered. Ollie would have to be an idiot to trust him with it again.

Right?

Right.

Why I want to read it: Doesn’t it just sound sweet and fun? I think by March, I’ll be ready for a strong dose of YA romance.

Release date: 3/3/2020

 

6. In Five Years by Rebecca Searle

What it’s about:Where do you see yourself in five years?

When Type-A Manhattan lawyer Dannie Cohan is asked this question at the most important interview of her career, she has a meticulously crafted answer at the ready. Later, after nailing her interview and accepting her boyfriend’s marriage proposal, Dannie goes to sleep knowing she is right on track to achieve her five-year plan.

But when she wakes up, she’s suddenly in a different apartment, with a different ring on her finger, and beside a very different man. The television news is on in the background, and she can just make out the scrolling date. It’s the same night—December 15—but 2025, five years in the future.

Why I want to read it: More time-shifting! Plus romance! Plus, I just read my first book by this author, The Dinner List (review), and completely fell in love with it.

Release date: 3/3/2020

 

7. A Murderous Relation (Veronica Speedwell #5) by Deanna Raybourn

What it’s about: Veronica Speedwell and her natural historian colleague Stoker are asked by Lady Wellingtonia Beauclerk to help with a potential scandal so explosive it threatens to rock the monarchy. Prince Albert Victor is a regular visitor to the most exclusive private club in London, known as the Club de l’Etoile, and the proprietess, Madame Aurore, has received an expensive gift that can be traced back to the prince. Lady Wellie would like Veronica and Stoker to retrieve the jewel from the club before scandal can break.

Why I want to read it: I love this series! Veronica is an amazing heroine, and her adventures with Stoker are always exciting, funny, and steamy. I’ve been ready for this book ever since I finished #4, A Dangerous Collaboration (review).

Release date: 3/10/2020

 

8. The Deep by Alma Katsu 

What it’s about:Someone, or something, is haunting the Titanic.

This is the only way to explain the series of misfortunes that have plagued the passengers of the ship from the moment they set sail: mysterious disappearances, sudden deaths. Now suspended in an eerie, unsettling twilight zone during the four days of the liner’s illustrious maiden voyage, a number of the passengers – including millionaires Madeleine Astor and Benjamin Guggenheim, the maid Annie Hebbley and Mark Fletcher – are convinced that something sinister is going on . . . And then, as the world knows, disaster strikes.

Years later and the world is at war. And a survivor of that fateful night, Annie, is working as a nurse on the sixth voyage of the Titanic’s sister ship, the Britannic, now refitted as a hospital ship. Plagued by the demons of her doomed first and near fatal journey across the Atlantic, Annie comes across an unconscious soldier she recognises while doing her rounds. It is the young man Mark. And she is convinced that he did not – could not – have survived the sinking of the Titanic . . .

Why I want to read it: Horror set on the Titanic? I need no further convincing — this is an absolute yes for me.

Release date: 3/10/2020

 

9. The Red Lotus by Chris Bohjalian

What it’s about:The first time Alexis saw Austin, it was a Saturday night. Not in a bar, but in the emergency room where Alexis sutured a bullet wound in Austin’s arm. Six months later, on the brink of falling in love, they travel to Vietnam on a bike tour so that Austin can show her his passion for cycling and he can pay his respects to the place where his father and uncle fought in the war. But as Alexis sips white wine and waits at the hotel for him to return from his solo ride, two men emerge from the tall grass and Austin vanishes into thin air. The only clue he leaves behind is a bright yellow energy gel dropped on the road. As Alexis grapples with this bewildering loss, and deals with the FBI, Austin’s prickly family, and her colleagues at the hospital, Alexis uncovers a series of strange lies that force her to wonder: Where did Austin go? Why did he really bring her to Vietnam? And how much danger has he left her in? Set amidst the adrenaline-fueled world of the emergency room, The Red Lotus is a global thriller about those who dedicate their lives to saving people, and those who peddle death to the highest bidder.

Why I want to read it: I’ve never yet been disappointed by a Chris Bohjalian book! The plot sounds fascinating — I’m dying to know what happens.

Release date: 3/17/2020

 

10. The Last Human by Zack Jordan 

What it’s about:The last human in the universe is on the run from a godlike intelligence in this rip-roaring debut space opera.

Sarya is the civilized galaxy’s worst nightmare: a Human.

Most days, Sarya doesn’t feel like the most terrifying creature in the galaxy.

Most days, she’s got other things on her mind. Like hiding her identity among the hundreds of alien species roaming the corridors of Watertower Station. Or making sure her adoptive mother doesn’t casually eviscerate one of their neighbors. Again.

And most days, she can almost accept that she’ll never know the truth–that she’ll never know why humanity was deemed too dangerous to exist. Or whether she really is–impossibly–the lone survivor of a species destroyed a millennium ago.

That is, until an encounter with a bounty hunter and a miles-long kinetic projectile leaves her life and her perspective shattered.

Why I want to read it: Who doesn’t love a good/funny space adventure?

Release date: 3/24/2020

 

Are you planning to read any of these? What books are you most excited for in early 2020?

Please share your thoughts, and if you wrote a TTT post, please share your link!

Top Ten Tuesday: Cold & snowy books for cold & snowy days

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is Holiday Reads — books we love to read during the holiday season. I don’t particularly read holiday-themed books, but I do love a good wintry feel. Since I’ve already done a TTT about winter settings, I thought I’d go with books with winter elements in the title — anything to do with snow or being cold. Brrrrrrr.

1. A Breath of Snow and Ashes by Diana Gabaldon – Yes, any excuse to include an Outlander book!

2. Shiver by Maggie Stiefvater – I didn’t love everything about this trilogy, but the first book in particular was so haunting and powerful.

3. Snowblind by Christopher Golden (review) – Yikes, horror in the snow! Pretty terrifying.

4. The Winter Long by Seanan McGuire (review) – I love me some Toby Daye. The entire series is excellent, and this was a particularly good one.

5. Frost Burned by Patricia Briggs (review) – I love the Mercy Thompson books too. Mercy is such an awesome hero.

6. A Fine and Bitter Snow by Dana Stabenow – The Kate Shugak series is one of my favorites… and a new book is coming in January!

7. Fables: 1001 Nights of Snowfall by Bill Willingham – The Fables series is amazing. I think I need a reread.

8. Snow Glass Apples by Neil Gaiman (review) – This story has always been a favorite, and the new illustrated version is gorgeous.

9. Carry On by Rainbow Rowell (because it’s about SIMON SNOW!!) (review) – All sorts of yes for Simon and Baz.

10. In Falling Snow by Mary-Rose MacColl (review) – A lovely historical novel that I read with my book group.

What are your favorite winter books?

Please share your thoughts, and if you wrote a TTT post, please share your link!

Top Ten Tuesday: Reasons I’m grateful for all the bookish people in my life

TTT autumn 2_bsf

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is a Thanksgiving freebie — so we can each come up with our own take on something we’re thankful for this year.

This time around, I thought I’d keep it simple and just talk about why I love having a book group and friends who love books. I’m not actually doing ten… just the top things that come to mind when I think about the bookish people in my life.

book group11. I’ve read so many books over the years thanks to my book group — books that I might not have picked up on my own, as well as classics that I might never have gotten around to without the group to motivate me.

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2. I’m an introvert — but put me in a room or across a table from someone who’s a reader, and the conversation flows.

3. I’m thankful that my family members include people who love books as much as I do… and for those that don’t, they tolerate my bookish obsessions, which is nice too.

4. I’m thankful for all the amazing book bloggers I’ve met since starting my blog seven years ago! Thanks to all of you, I’ve engaged in fantastic discussions, considered new ideas, discovered so many amazing books, and have found a true community.

5. It’s thrilling to have friends who will geek out with me over the latest book in a series, or will share my terror that something bad will happen to a character I love.

6. I love having friends who will go with me to a used bookstore just because it’s there. Do we know how to have fun or what?

7. It’s great going to a silent reading party with people who will sit silently beside me and read their own books and not talk to me… and walk out when it’s done talking about what a great time we all had!

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8. It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without giving a big shout-out of appreciation to the public library, indie bookstores, and most especially, to the nonprofit organizations who focus on reading, books, and literacy. There are so many ways to share our love of reading while making a difference in the world! (Check out this list on Goodreads to get started.)

As a booklover, there’s so much to feel thankful for, this year and always! What books or bookish things are you most grateful for this Thanksgiving week?

Please share your thoughts, and if you wrote a TTT post, please share your link!

Top Ten Tuesday: Halloween freebie — Ten horror books on my TBR list

halloweentop10

Happy Halloween!

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is a Halloween freebie! For past Halloween freebies, I’ve done lists about witches and lists about ghosts, as well as some really icky, gross horror novels. This time, I thought I’d keep it simple and just list a bunch of horror novels on my to-read list that I really do need to get around to reading! (Too late to read them in time for this Halloween, but there’s always next year!)

To top ten to-read horror books are:

 

  1. We Sold Our Souls by Grady Hendrix
  2. Needful Things by Stephen King
  3. A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay
  4. Blackbirds by Chuck Wendig
  5. Dread Nation by Justina Ireland
  6. We Are Where the Nightmares Go by C. Robert Cargill
  7. Full Throttle and Strange Weather by Joe Hill (okay, those are two separate books, but since they’re both story collections by Joe Hill, I’m counting them as one!)
  8. Imaginary Friend by Stephen Chbosky
  9. The Hunger by Alma Katsu
  10. The Terror by Dan Simmons

Have you read any of these? Which one should I read first?

So what’s on your Halloween TTT this week? Share your link, please, and I’ll come check out your top 10!

♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥

Do you host a book blog meme? Do you participate in a meme that you really, really love? I host a Book Blog Meme Directory, and I’m always looking for new additions! If you know of a great meme to include — or if you host one yourself — please drop me a note on my Contact page and I’ll be sure to add your info.

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