Shelf Control #336: Little Brother by Cory Doctorow

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

A programming note: I’ll be taking a mini-hiatus next week while traveling, and as of now, I’m not planning to do a Shelf Control post for 9/28. I’ll be back the following week!

Title: Little Brother
Author: Cory Doctorow
Published: 2008
Length: 382 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

Marcus aka “w1n5t0n,” is only seventeen years old, but he figures he already knows how the system works–and how to work the system. Smart, fast, and wise to the ways of the networked world, he has no trouble outwitting his high school’s intrusive but clumsy surveillance systems.

But his whole world changes when he and his friends find themselves caught in the aftermath of a major terrorist attack on San Francisco. In the wrong place at the wrong time, Marcus and his crew are apprehended by the Department of Homeland Security and whisked away to a secret prison where they’re mercilessly interrogated for days.

When the DHS finally releases them, his injured best friend Darryl does not come out. The city has become a police state where every citizen is treated like a potential terrorist. He knows that no one will believe his story, which leaves him only one option: “M1k3y” will take down the DHS himself.

How and when I got it:

I bought a paperback copy about 3 years ago.

Why I want to read it:

To be honest, I’m not entirely sure that I do want to read this! I’ve heard about Little Brother for years, but in general, tech-focused sci-fi isn’t usually my jam. Still, check out those blurbs by Neil Gaiman and Scott Westerfeld!

This book pops up on a lot of “best of” geeky reading lists, but I didn’t have a copy of my own until a few years ago, when I picked one up thinking it might entice my son to read a book other than those assigned for school. Nope, he didn’t show any interest, but I’ve held onto it, thinking I’d want to read it eventually.

So far, I haven’t been motivated to pick it up and give it a try, so at this point, I’m inclined to think that Little Brother will go in the donate pile next time I need to clear more room on my shelves. But… I’m open to being persuaded that I should keep it and read it!

What do you think? Would you read this book? And if you’ve read it, do you recommend it?

Please share your thoughts!


__________________________________

Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments or link back from your own post, so I can add you to the participant list.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

The Monday Check-In ~ 9/19/2022

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My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

This has been a super-slow reading week for me… or maybe it just feels that way because I’m reading a 600+ page book. Nope, it really has been slow — too many distractions!

One fun distraction — through a work giveaway, I got a table-top s’mores maker! So naturally, my son and I had to test it out and make sure all was in order. Yup… yummy!!

And in more fun news… don’t you love it when your favorite authors have special mailings for their subscribers/followers? My birthday is coming up this week, and this arrived in the mail a few days ago (from the amazing Mary Robinette Kowal):

A programming note:

I’m going to be away for a few days next week, and I’m planning to keep online commitments to a minimum… so I probably won’t be doing much blogging. I’ll be back in full swing the week of October 3rd!

What did I read during the last week?

I managed to finish two audiobooks this week, although I’m still slooooowly working my way through the same hardcover book that I started last Sunday.

I finished:

Birds of California by Katie Cotugno: A Hollywood romance with heart (and a very enjoyable audiobook experience). My review is here.

Mr. Perfect on Paper by Jean Meltzer: A Jewish rom-com, fun and light. My review is here.

Pop culture & TV:

The Handmaid’s Tale is back for a new season… and I’m not sure how I feel about it. I’m still watching, but this show is so bleak (and does such strange things with its character development) that I’m always on the fence about whether I want to continue.

Fresh Catch:

No new books this week.

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

Fairy Tale by Stephen King: This book is long, and it feels like it’s taking forever! I’m really liking it so far — I just wish I’d had more substantial reading time this past week.

Now playing via audiobook:

Travel by Bullet by John Scalzi: Book #3 in the Dispatcher series — I really liked the first two books, so weird and twisted! I’ll be starting this one on my Monday morning commute.

Ongoing reads:

My longer-term reading commitments:

  • Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone by Diana Gabaldon: Over at Outlander Book Club, we’re doing a group read of BEES, reading and discussing two chapters per week. If anyone wants to join us, just ask me how! All are welcome.
  • Geektastic: Stories from the Nerd Herd edited by Holly Black and Cecil Castellucci: I’m reading this story collection in little bits and pieces, but made absolutely no progress this week. (Blame Stephen King and his huge new novel!!)
  • A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain: This is my new Classics Club Spin book! (If you want to know more about this fun challenge, check out my post here). I’m going to read this one via the Serial Reader app — there are 54 installments, but since the challenge due date is October 30th, I’ll need to double-up at least part of the time. I’m pretty happy about ending up with this book — wish me luck!

So many books, so little time…

boy1

Shelf Control #335: The Book of Speculation by Erica Swyler

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

Title: The Book of Speculation
Author: Erika Swyler
Published: 2015
Length: 339 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

Simon Watson, a young librarian, lives alone in a house that is slowly crumbling toward the Long Island Sound. His parents are long dead. His mother, a circus mermaid who made her living by holding her breath, drowned in the very water his house overlooks. His younger sister, Enola, ran off six years ago and now reads tarot cards for a traveling carnival.

One June day, an old book arrives on Simon’s doorstep, sent by an antiquarian bookseller who purchased it on speculation. Fragile and water damaged, the book is a log from the owner of a traveling carnival in the 1700s, who reports strange and magical things, including the drowning death of a circus mermaid. Since then, generations of “mermaids” in Simon’s family have drowned–always on July 24, which is only weeks away.

As his friend Alice looks on with alarm, Simon becomes increasingly worried about his sister. Could there be a curse on Simon’s family? What does it have to do with the book, and can he get to the heart of the mystery in time to save Enola?

In the tradition of Sara Gruen’s Water for Elephants, Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus, and Elizabeth Kostova’s The Historian, The Book of Speculation–with two-color illustrations by the author–is Erika Swyler’s moving debut novel about the power of books, family, and magic.

How and when I got it:

I picked up a paperback in 2016, and it’s been on my shelf ever since.

Why I want to read it:

As I’m writing this post, it occurs to me that perhaps I never even read the synopsis before today! The plot sounds kind of bonkers, in a really good way, but doesn’t seem in the slightest bit familiar. So, I’m thinking I may have grabbed this book at a library sale based solely on the cover. I mean, can’t go wrong with a book with books on the cover, right?

Now that I’ve read what it’s about, I’m much more interested in finally giving the book a try. Generations of circus mermaids? A mystery curse? Count me in!

What do you think? Would you read this book?

Please share your thoughts!


__________________________________

Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments or link back from your own post, so I can add you to the participant list.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

The Monday Check-In ~ 9/12/2022

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My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

One of my hobbies/passions, going all the way back to my teens, has always been Israeli folk dancing. It’s something I let go of for about 10 years while raising kids, working, etc, but just this past spring, as in-person dancing starting up again after two years of not happening during the pandemic, my husband and I decided to try getting back into it, and it’s been amazing.

This past weekend, I had the opportunity to go to two different dancing events, and it was so much fun! It’s incredible how much comes back, despite being away from it all these years. My feet are very sore, but it was worth it!

What did I read during the last week?

Be the Serpent (October Daye, #16) by Seanan McGuire. This new release (in my favorite urban fantasy series) absolutely blew me away! My review is here.

Fangirl, volume 2 (manga) by Rainbow Rowell and Sam Maggs: This manga version of a favorite novel was fine, but didn’t make much of an impression — maybe because it’s only one-quarter of the story, and it didn’t feel like anything that happened in this volume was particularly memorable. *shrug* I’ll still read the rest, whenever the last two volumes are released…

The Kaiju Preservation Society by John Scalzi: So much fun! The story is amazing, and audiobook narration (by Wil Wheaton) had me laughing out loud in the car (probably causing other drivers to have doubts about my wellbeing). My review is here.

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell: I read this one for my book group (I’m actually a week early!), and once again, I’m very grateful. Without my book group, I might not have gotten around to this lovely book! My review is here.

Birds of California by Katie Cotugno: I just finished the audiobook late Sunday. Review to follow.

Pop culture & TV:

Fantasy prequels continue! The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power and The House of the Dragon are both holding my interest much more than expected.

For lighter viewing, I started watching Uncoupled (starring Neil Patrick Harris) this week. Funny, sweet, and doesn’t require much brain power!

Fresh Catch:

Ooooh, new books!

After a botched delivery attempt with a damaged book, a replacement edition of Stephen King’s newest novel arrived over the weekend! Can’t wait to get started.

I also got myself a nice gift — I had some Amazon points stocked up, and used them to get this all-in-one edition of the Paper Girls graphic novels. I read the first 2 or 3 volumes a few years ago, but after watching the TV adaptation, I was feeking inspired to go back and read the whole thing from the beginning.

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

What to read, what to read? After finishing Hamnet, I was planning to start Fairy Tale right away… but it’s 600 pages and I do have some September ARCs to consider too.

Now playing via audiobook:

Mr. Perfect on Paper by Jean Meltzer: Just getting started! I enjoyed the author’s previous book (The Matzah Ball), and hope this will be a fun listen.

Ongoing reads:

My longer-term reading commitments:

  • Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone by Diana Gabaldon: Over at Outlander Book Club, we’re doing a group read of BEES, reading and discussing two chapters per week. If anyone wants to join us, just ask me how! All are welcome.
  • Geektastic: Stories from the Nerd Herd edited by Holly Black and Cecil Castellucci: I’m reading this story collection in little bits and pieces. I only read one more story this week — about a cheerleader who hires the school geek group to tutor her on geek culture so she can impress her boyfriend. I really liked it!

So many books, so little time…

boy1

Shelf Control #334: Victories Greater Than Death by Charlie Jane Anders

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

Title: Victories Greater Than Death
Author: Charlie Jane Anders
Published: 2021
Length: 288 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

Tina never worries about being ‘ordinary’—she doesn’t have to, since she’s known practically forever that she’s not just Tina Mains, average teenager and beloved daughter. She’s also the keeper of an interplanetary rescue beacon, and one day soon, it’s going to activate, and then her dreams of saving all the worlds and adventuring among the stars will finally be possible. Tina’s legacy, after all, is intergalactic—she is the hidden clone of a famed alien hero, left on Earth disguised as a human to give the universe another chance to defeat a terrible evil.

But when the beacon activates, it turns out that Tina’s destiny isn’t quite what she expected. Things are far more dangerous than she ever assumed. Luckily, Tina is surrounded by a crew she can trust, and her best friend Rachael, and she is still determined to save all the worlds. But first she’ll have to save herself.

Buckle up your seatbelt for this thrilling sci-fi adventure set against an intergalactic war from international bestselling author Charlie Jane Anders.

How and when I got it:

I bought a hardcover soon after the book’s release in 2021.

Why I want to read it:

This is a more recent book for me, in terms of Shelf Control picks, since it’s only been on my shelf for a year. Still, I’ve had it for a year and haven’t picked it up… so the question is, will I?

I do know that Charlie Jane Anders is a writer I really enjoy. I used to read her columns quite a bit when she wrote for io9, and I really enjoyed her novel All the Birds in the Sky. At the same time, I do already have two other books by her on my shelves, still unread, so why did I add a 3rd?

I’m actually not entirely sure why I bought this book, but I believe I’d seen a few very positive reviews, and there was a hardcover sale that day, so I gave in to temptation! Victories Greater Than Death is not a long book, and it seems like it would be a quick, enjoyable read. It’s YA sci-fi, and space battles and clones and aliens sound like a winning combination!

This is the first in a trilogy (book #2, Dreams Bigger Than Heartbreak, was released in April 2022, and the 3rd book, Promises Greater Than Darkness, is expected in 2023). I don’t think I realized that this wasn’t a stand-alone when I purchased it, but I suppose I’m up for giving it a try and then deciding if I want to continue.

What do you think? Would you read this book?

Please share your thoughts!


__________________________________

Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments or link back from your own post, so I can add you to the participant list.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

The Monday Check-In ~ 9/5/2022

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My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

So lovely to have a 3-day weekend! Although I’m a little sad that summer is pretty much over…

What did I read during the last week?

Killers of a Certain Age by Deanna Raybourn: A fun read, although I’m not entirely comfortable with the main concept. I keep wavering between a 3.5 and 4 star rating. My review is here.

When Sorrows Come (October Daye, #15) by Seanan McGuire: An audio re-read, in preparation for the newly released 16th book in the series. I loved this one all over again! My review from my first read is here.

Pop culture & TV:

I actually went out for entertainment this week! My husband and I went to see the national touring company production of Oklahoma (the 2019 Broadway revival version). It was… thought-provoking, different, uncomfortable, sometimes funny, sometimes disturbing. Here’s the trailer, which seems to make it seem very upbeat and full of fun dance moments, but honestly, that’s not the overall mood. Some excellent performances, but also some really weird staging choices (including scenes taking place in utter darkness and the use of huge video projections).

And in home entertainment…

So much fantasy! Between The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power and The House of the Dragon, there’s almost too much to choose from!

Fresh Catch:

No new books this week.

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

Be the Serpent (October Daye, #16) by Seanan McGuire: Well OF COURSE I was going to start this book the first second I could! As of writing this post (Sunday afternoon) I’m getting close to the end, am completely blown away by where the story has gone, and absolutely need to keep reading until I finish. It’s amazing to see how strong a series can be after so many books! Keep an eye out for my review, once I reach the end and recover a bit!

Now playing via audiobook:

The Kaiju Preservation Society by John Scalzi: I bought a hard copy of this book when it came out earlier this year, but didn’t have a chance to get to it until now. Loving the audiobook version, narrated by the super talented Wil Wheaton!

Ongoing reads:

My longer-term reading commitments:

  • Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone by Diana Gabaldon: Over at Outlander Book Club, we’re doing a group read of BEES, reading and discussing two chapters per week. If anyone wants to join us, just ask me how! All are welcome.
  • Geektastic: Stories from the Nerd Herd edited by Holly Black and Cecil Castellucci: I’m reading this story collection in little bits and pieces. I haven’t gotten very far yet, but the first story — about an encounter between Jedi and Klingon cosplayers at a con — is quite fun.

So many books, so little time…

boy1

Shelf Control #333: Daughter of the Forest (Sevenwaters, #1) by Juliet Marillier

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

Title: Daughter of the Forest (Sevenwaters, #1)
Author: Juliet Marillier
Published: 1999
Length: 554 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

Lovely Sorcha is the seventh child and only daughter of Lord Colum of Sevenwaters. Bereft of a mother, she is comforted by her six brothers who love and protect her. Sorcha is the light in their lives: they are determined that she know only contentment.

But Sorcha’s joy is shattered when her father is bewitched by his new wife, an evil enchantress who binds her brothers with a terrible spell, a spell which only Sorcha can lift—by staying silent. If she speaks before she completes the quest set to her by the Fair Folk and their queen, the Lady of the Forest, she will lose her brothers forever.

When Sorcha is kidnapped by the enemies of Sevenwaters and taken to a foreign land, she is torn between the desire to save her beloved brothers, and a love that comes only once. Sorcha despairs at ever being able to complete her task, but the magic of the Fair Folk knows no boundaries, and love is the strongest magic of them all…

How and when I got it:

I’ve had an old paperback on my shelves for years — no idea exactly where it came from!

Why I want to read it:

I’m always up for a good faerie kingdom story, and this is a book (and series) that I’ve seen recommended many times over the years. It regularly appears in lists of great fantasy series, and I know I’ve seen readers with tastes that align with my own talk about how much they love this book.

The plot sounds complicated but compelling. Faerie bargains, strange kingdoms, and mystical elements all sound right up my alley — plus, from descriptions on Goodreads and elsewhere, it seems that these books are very much influenced by Celtic folklore, which absolutely appeals to me.

Daughter of the Forest is the first in a six-book series. I tend to be pretty reluctant these days about starting new series… but I do feel tempted to at least give this first book a try.

What do you think? Would you read this book?

Please share your thoughts!


__________________________________

Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments or link back from your own post, so I can add you to the participant list.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

The Monday Check-In ~ 8/29/2022

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My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

Another busy week, but at least I managed to squeeze in a little outdoor time over the weekend!

What did I read during the last week?

A Mirror Mended (Fractured Fables, #2) by Alix E. Harrow: I loved the first book in the series (A Spindle Splintered), so why did this sequel feel so “meh” to me? I couldn’t even figure out what to say about it, so I didn’t end up writing a review. It wasn’t a bad read — it just didn’t leave an impression.

All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot: Awwww… listening to this audiobook is such a warm, lovely experience. My review is here.

Love on the Brain by Ali Hazelwood: I kind of hate the cover art (too cartoon-y), but otherwise really enjoyed this quirky romance starring a woman in STEM. My review is here.

The Most Likely Club by Elyssa Friedland: Engaging contemporary fiction about enduring friendship and its power to change lives. My review is here.

Pop culture & TV:

Little bits of lots of shows this week! I watched season 2 of Indian Matchmaking (a guilty pleasure for sure!), plus episodes of Revervation Dogs, She-Hulk, and What We Do in the Shadows.

My husband and I finally finished season 1 of The Beauty Queen of Jerusalem (he’s not a binge-watcher, so it took us forever). If I can get him to agree, we’ll start season 2 this week!

And, like millions of people, I started House of the Dragon. Mixed feelings, for sure. I mean, it’s fine — but it’s also nothing new. Dragons, the Iron Throne, people slaughtering each other for no reason… been there, done that. I’ll keep watching, but I’m not exactly awestricken.

Fresh Catch:

I already read an ARC of this book, but absolutely needed the hardcover for my shelves! So pretty…

(I loved this new adventure in the ongoing Mercy series — my review is here.)

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

Killers of a Certain Age by Deanna Raybourn: Just getting started — but the premise sounds terrific, and I always enjoy this author.

Now playing via audiobook:

When Sorrows Come (October Daye, #15) by Seanan McGuire: The 16th October Daye book will be released in early September… and that means it’s time to reread #15! I always enjoy the Toby audiobooks — this one is particularly fun.

Ongoing reads:

My longer-term reading commitments:

  • Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone by Diana Gabaldon: Over at Outlander Book Club, we’re doing a group read of BEES, reading and discussing two chapters per week. If anyone wants to join us, just ask me how! All are welcome.
  • Geektastic: Stories from the Nerd Herd edited by Holly Black and Cecil Castellucci: My daughter gave me this story collection a while back, and I thought I’d read it in bits and pieces, rather than all at once. I’m terrible when it comes to reading short stories, but my goal is to read 2 – 3 a week, either until I’m done or I’ve at least read all the stories that interest me.

So many books, so little time…

boy1

Shelf Control #332: Mr. Flood’s Last Resort by Jess Kidd

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

Title: Mr. Flood’s Last Resort
Author: Jess Kidd
Published: 2018
Length: 352 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

The spellbinding tale of a lonely caregiver and a cranky hoarder with a house full of secrets.

Maud Drennan is a dedicated caregiver whose sunny disposition masks a deep sadness. A tragic childhood event left her haunted, in the company of a cast of prattling saints who pop in and out of her life like tourists. Other than visiting her agoraphobic neighbor, Maud keeps to herself, finding solace in her work and in her humble existence–until she meets Mr. Flood.

Cathal Flood is a menace by all accounts. The lone occupant of a Gothic mansion crawling with feral cats, he has been waging war against his son’s attempts to put him into an old-age home and sent his last caretaker running for the madhouse. But Maud is this impossible man’s last chance: if she can help him get the house in order, he just might be able to stay. So the unlikely pair begins to cooperate, bonding over their shared love of Irish folktales and mutual dislike of Mr. Flood’s overbearing son.

Still, shadows are growing in the cluttered corners of the mansion, hinting at buried family secrets, and reminding Maud that she doesn’t really know this man at all. When the forgotten case of a missing schoolgirl comes to light, she starts poking around, and a full-steam search for answers begins.

Packed with eccentric charms, twisted comedy, and a whole lot of heart, Mr. Flood’s Last Resort is a mesmerizing tale that examines the space between sin and sainthood, reminding us that often the most meaningful forgiveness that we can offer is to ourselves.

How and when I got it:

I picked up the e-book edition of this book at some point in the last couple of years.

Why I want to read it:

I already had my eye on this author’s books (I have at least one other on my shelves that I want to read), and so I grabbed this one when I stumbled across a Kindle price break for it.

I can’t quite figure out what to make of the plot description! Based on the cute cover and some parts of the synopsis — “eccentric charms”, “twisted comedy” — it looks light and whimsical. But it also refers to darker secrets and a missing girl, and then there’s the bit about Maud being haunted by saints. Literally haunted? Like there are ghosts? I’m so confused.

When I look on Goodreads, I see other editions of the book that have a completely different (and utterly nonwhimsical) look to them:

I believe The Hoarder was the version published in the UK. Neither of these editions gives off warm or quirky vibes at all. Hmmm, what to make of it all?

The adorable look of the Kindle edition is definitely what initially caught my eye, so seeing that this book might not be what it seems give me very mixed feelings. At the same time, I really don’t want to start reading Goodreads reviews to investigate further, because I’m afraid I’ll out more than I want to know at this point!

Because of my confusion about the overall tone of the book, I’m a little hesitant — although I do think the general description of the storyline sounds intriguing!

What do you think? Would you read this book?

Please share your thoughts!


__________________________________

Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments or link back from your own post, so I can add you to the participant list.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

The Monday Check-In ~ 8/22/2022

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My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

It’s been a super busy week at work, and even though I slowed down over the weekend, I still felt like I had no time to read!

What did I read during the last week?

Well, okay, I did manage to read some books…

The Very Secret Society of Irregular Witches by Sangu Mandanna: Sweet, whimsical, and magical. My review is here.

Hamlet by William Shakespeare: Done! This was a group read with my book club — we finished this past week. Terrific experience reading and discussing this classic with the group. What can I say? My book group rocks!

Soul Taken (Mercy Thompson, #13) by Patricia Briggs: The awesomeness that is the Mercy Thompson series finally has a new release! This series (and its main character) continues to be an absolute favorite. My review is here.

Pop culture & TV:

I finished the first season of Paper Girls and the third season of Never Have I Ever this week. Two very different shows, but both were terrific!

Also this past week, I tried the first episode of She-Hulk (pretty good so far) and continued with new episodes of Reservation Dogs (excellent) and What We Do In The Shadows (also excellent).

Fresh Catch:

I read an e-ARC of this book when it came out last year (my review), and with its paperback release, the publisher was kind enough to send me a copy! It’s really a great, disturbing, twisty read — highly recommended!

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

I haven’t quite settled on my next book, so I’m reading the opening chapters of two! Let’s see which one hooks me first.

Now playing via audiobook:

All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot: I’m enjoying this audiobook so much! But — argh — I expected to finish it over the weekend, then ran out of time. I think just one or two more days of driving to work should do it for me!

Ongoing reads:

My longer-term reading commitments:

  • Go Tell the Bees That I Am Gone by Diana Gabaldon: Over at Outlander Book Club, we’re doing a group read of BEES, reading and discussing two chapters per week. If anyone wants to join us, just ask me how! All are welcome. Update: As of this week, we’re up to chapter 50 — and since there are 155 chapters in all, that means we’re at about 32%. Still a long way to go!
  • Nothing else at the moment! My book group’s next classic read doesn’t start until October, so for now, I’m light on long-term reading commitments, and I’m not hating it.

So many books, so little time…

boy1