Top Ten Tuesday: Reading resolutions for 2018

As of this week, the Top Ten Tuesday meme moves to a new host blog. Started originally by The Broke and the Bookish, Top Ten Tuesday will now be hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl. Same great concept, just a new host! Top Ten Tuesday focuses on a different top 10 theme each week — check out the host blog for a list of upcoming topics.

This week’s topic is Bookish Resolutions/Goals 

For me, my #1 resolution is to STOP MAKING RESOLUTIONS.

Ha.

But I kind of mean it. I don’t want to create yet another list of resolutions for myself that will fall by the wayside within a week or two. So instead, I’ll just write about the overall ideas I have about how I want to read in 2018.

My goal, this year and every year, is to read whatever I want, whenever I want! No commitments. No deadlines. No pressures.

 

I don’t participate in reading challenges or read-a-thons. I’ve tried in the past, but I find that tailoring my reading to meet pre-selected categories, genres, or themes makes me feel completely stifled. Where’s the fun in reading if I feel like I HAVE TO read something, rather than just wanting to?

 

Still, I do have some rather loose goals that I’m aiming toward this year. I do want to get to some of the series that I’ve had my eye on for a while. I hope to at least start my “priority series” — and then, if they grab me, make a good-sized dent in the rest.

 

I’ve managed to cut way back on the number of ARCs I request — but for those that I have, I feel a commitment to reading them and reviewing them on or about their release dates. It’s only polite!

 

I intend to do some more sorting and culling of the books on my shelves. I need to face the fact that I have certain books that I’m just never, ever in the mood to read… so why keep them? A few more donation binges are in order!

 

Speaking of books on my shelves… my bookshelves need a major overhaul. When I first set them up, they were roughly organized by genre, but over the years, my method of shelving has devolved into “hmmm, this book seems to fit this tiny space”. Not at all helpful when it comes to actually finding something later on. So, at some point, I need to pull everything off the shelves (gasp!) and start fresh, and hopefully come up with an organizational system that isn’t just about where things fit.

 

I plan to read a few more classics through the Serial Reader app, which I really love. It’s so much fun to make daily progress, especially when it’s a book that seems overwhelming on its own. Check out Serial Reader, if you haven’t already. Let me know what goodies you find! I’m thinking, for me, it’ll be a Dickens kind of year.

 

Well, that’s only seven, but that’s enough! Really, my mindset when it comes to reading in 2018 is…

 

 

What are your reading goals for 2018? If you wrote a TTT post this week, please share your link!

♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥

Do you host a book blog meme? Do you participate in a meme that you really, really love? I’m building a Book Blog Meme Directory, and need your help! If you know of a great meme to include — or if you host one yourself — please drop me a note on my Contact page and I’ll be sure to add your info!

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The Monday Check-In ~ 1/15/2018

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

What did I read last week?

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman: The illustrated version is such a treat! See below for a link to my post about this book and Saga.

Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots by Deborah Feldman: I finished the audiobook! My review is here.

Binti by Nnedi Okarafor: Another audiobook — I decided to re-read via audio, and although I’m glad I revisited the story, I can’t say that I was terribly impressed by the audiobook itself. This is one book thats’ definitely better on the page.

In graphic novels:

I caught up on Saga! Such an amazing series.

I wrote up some thoughts on Neverwhere and Saga, here.

Fresh Catch:

Three new books this week:

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

I’m FINALLY reading Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld, which has been sitting on my nightstand for over a year now.

Now playing via audiobook:

Miss Kopp’s Midnight Confessions by Amy Stewart: I’m really excited to be starting the 3rd Kopp Sisters book!

Ongoing reads:

Book group reads:

  • Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott: Finally, it’s the last week of my book group’s classic read!
  • Lord John and the Succubus by Diana Gabaldon: Our group read of this novella continues — contact me if you’d like to join in.

So many books, so little time…

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Saga and Neverwhere: Cool-looking stuff that I read this week

Instead of writing lengthy reviews (as I have a tendency to do), I thought I’d share quick looks at two of my reading obsessions from this past week.

SAGA by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples:

I love Lying Cat. And that’s the truth.

What can I say about the glories of the Saga series? In a nutshell, this comic series tells the story of two star-crossed lovers, Alana and Marko. Their worlds have been at war for generations, and when they desert their respective armies and begin life on the run together, they’re hunted and despised by both sides. The world of Saga is utterly wonderful, with bizarre beings such as Lying Cat, a race of robots with TV screens for heads, an adorable little seal-like creature who’s dangerous AF, and so much more. The artwork is astounding, with a mind-blowing array of gorgeous, strange, and often disgusting creatures and people and planets. The storyline is intense and always surprising, with plenty of danger and violence, but also some truly funny dialogue and situations.

Take note that Saga is definitely NSFW — between gory violence and explicit illustrations of sex acts and genitalia, this isn’t something you want your coworkers reading over your shoulders. (Unless they’re very cool coworkers, but you might be at risk of violating some company policies… )

Saga is available as standard comic editions, but I prefer to wait and read the trade-paperback editions. The 8th paperback volume just came out this month, which is what prompted my Saga binge this week — I re-read #5, then continued straight through 6, 7, and 8. There are also deluxe hardcover editions available, and if I’m ever feeling super rich, I will absolutely treat myself to those as well.

Saga is amazing, people! Don’t miss out.

NEVERWHERE by Neil Gaiman, with illustrations by Chris Riddell

Neverwhere is a classic Neil Gaiman fantasy, originally written as a teleplay for BBC in 1996 before being turned by Gaiman into a novel… which he then continued to tinker with over the years, until now, more than 20 years since its inception, Neverwhere has been published in the author’s “preferred” version of the text, with gorgeous, haunting black-and-white illustrations by the talented Chris Riddell throughout the book.

Neverwhere is the story of Richard Mayhew, an every-man who stumbles out of his normal life and into the dark, hidden, magical world of London Below. Swept away from everything and everyone he thought he knew, Richard finds himself embarking on a quest with the Lady Door, a bodyguard named Hunter, and the mysterious yet dashing Marquis de Carabas. As they avoid the deadly assassins Mr. Croup and Mr. Vandemar, Richard and his comrades journey through sewers and non-existent underground platforms, meet angels and beasts, and visit the Floating Market. Finally, when Richard has a chance to return to his former life, he has to decide whether he really wants “normal” after all.

I originally read Neverwhere years ago, and gave it only 3-stars at the time. To be honest, I’m not entirely sure that I even finished it, since the last half of so of the book seemed completely new to me. The illustrations here really add to the story, bringing the strange characters to life and adding interest and intrigue to practically every page.

At its heart, Neverwhere is a portal story, where a character steps from our world into something new and different, facing dangers but also encountering wonders beyond imagination. Perhaps my appreciation for this type of tale has grown over the years, but I did enjoy the story a lot more this time around — and the illustrations definitely helped me get into the strange world of Neverwhere in a new and marvelous way.

For more on the artist’s process of illustrating Neverwhere, see this article. And below, enjoy a few snippets of pages from the book. (Click to view larger versions).

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Audiobook Review: Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots


The instant New York Times bestselling memoir of a young Jewish woman’s escape from a religious sect, in the tradition of Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s Infidel and Carolyn Jessop’s Escape, featuring a new epilogue by the author.

The Satmar sect of Hasidic Judaism is as mysterious as it is intriguing to outsiders. In this arresting memoir, Deborah Feldman reveals what life is like trapped within a religious tradition that values silence and suffering over individual freedoms.

Deborah grew up under a code of relentlessly enforced customs governing everything from what she could wear and to whom she could speak to what she was allowed to read. It was stolen moments spent with the empowered literary characters of Jane Austen and Louisa May Alcott that helped her to imagine an alternative way of life. Trapped as a teenager in a sexually and emotionally dysfunctional marriage to a man she barely knew, the tension between Deborah’s desires and her responsibilities as a good Satmar girl grew more explosive until she gave birth at nineteen and realized that, for the sake of herself and her son, she had to escape.

Unorthodox is a fascinating look into a world that’s largely unknown and hidden. The insular Satmar Hasidic community in which Deborah was raised has no tolerance for outside influence or interference, and at the same time, leaves no room for individuality or privacy.

All aspects of life are strictly governed, from what to wear to how to speak to what to eat to when to have sex with your husband. As a child, Deborah’s world revolved around family — the grandparents who raised her, the strict aunt who dictated every step of Deborah’s upbringing and education. Even so, Deborah was different, which can be unforgiveable among the Satmar — her father was either “crazy” or “retarded”, depending on who you asked, and her mother left the Satmar world when she left her unhappy marriage, leaving young Deborah behind.

As Deborah grows, she follows the rules carefully, always fearful of the contant watchful eyes and incessant gossip in their close-knit community, yet also yearning to expand her horizons. She sneaks forbidden books from a library from a different neighborhood, hiding Harry Potter and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn under her mattress, and takes the subway into Manhattan to be dazzled by the glimpse of another kind of life.

Still, Deborah does what is expected of her, married at age 17 to a groom she barely knows, enjoying the trappings of being a bride even while the horrible reality of her situation is driven home. The chapter on Deborah’s introduction to marriage is horrifying. Prior to the wedding, Deborah takes the mandatory “bride classes” that all Satmar girls take, learning essential requirements about going to the mikveh (ritual bath), about being unclean for two weeks due to her period (and the ridiculous steps women have to take before being considered clean enough to resume marital relations), how to run a good Jewish home, and then finally, in the last lesson, what sex is and what’s expected of her.

The sex talk Deborah gets is less than informative:

A man and a woman’s bodies were created like two interlocking puzzle pieces, she says. I hear her describe a hallway with walls, leading to a little door, which open to a womb, the mekor, she calls it, “the source.” I can’t imagine where an entire system like that could be positioned. She tries to tell me about the passageway that leads to “the source,” how this passageway is entered, demonstrating with her forefinger inserted into the ring of the thumb and forefinger of her other hand, and making ridiculous thrusting motions. I’m guessing that that motion is referring to the part where they click into place. Still, I can’t see where that spot, that entryway, can exist on my own body. As far as I know, the place where the pee comes out isn’t that stretchy. I finally stop her.

“Um, I don’t have that,” I say, giggling nervously.

The girls of the community are kept so utterly ignorant of their own bodies that she has no comprehension of having a vagina! Things go from bad to worse, as the couple is unable to consummate their marriage for a full year, as clumsy fumbling leads to frustration, which leads to deep anxiety and tension on Deborah’s part, making her physically unable to relax enough to permit her husband to complete the act. It’s horrible to hear the suffering that this young girl endures, with emotional damage heaped on top of physical suffering.

Finally, after becoming a mother at age 19, Deborah begins to secretly seek an outlet for her unfulfilled yearning for independence and knowledge, enrolling in classes, learning to drive, and venturing outside of her community and its heavy expectations. The more she encounters of the outside world, the more strongly she’s convinced that her future lies elsewhere. Ultimately, she finds a way to start a new life for herself and her young son, and finds the freedom she’s longed for all her life.

The narrative is intimate and informative, as Deborah walks us through the phases of a girl’s life, from early education through puberty and into young adulthood, when the entire focus becomes making a good match. We see the structures in place to enforce obedience and strict adherence to the religious rules that govern all aspects of life. The imbalance between the sexes is laughable — a woman’s life has as its purpose creating a home for her husband and raising children. There’s no room for individuality, and people with other interests are either shunned or, like Deborah and her mother before her, must leave entirely in order to have a life that feels true.

The audiobook, narrated by Rachel Botchan, captures the dialogue and the patterns of conversations quite well, as well as conveying the Yiddish terms that are peppered throughout the book. The narration flows nicely, and gives the listener a real sense of Deborah’s inner life, moods, and emotional struggles.

Quibbles:

While I found the story overall quite powerful, there are a few aspects that stuck out and were problems for me.

  • While talking about how unhappy she is in her marriage, Deborah states that she’d never be able to leave without leaving her son behind, because the rabbinical courts would never allow a Satmar woman to leave and take a child with her. Yet in the end, Deborah and her husband decide to divorce, and Deborah leaves with their son. How? Why was she allowed to take the child? What was the legal process? Was there some sort of agreement put into place? There’s no explanation offered, and considering that she pointed this out as a reason for her feeling trapped in her marriage, I needed to get some of information about why this worked out for her.
  • The author has a tendency to ascribe emotions to people based on her interactions with them, and this often rings false. When she goes to the mikveh for the first time in preparation for her wedding, she decides that the attendant “thinks she is better than I am” based on the tone of her voice, and later, when she feels embarrassed during the highly personal inspection that’s entailed, she says:

The attendant’s face is stern, but there is a faint whiff of triumph about her movements… She’s baiting me.

It all comes across as a big case of projection, as far as I can tell. Yes, the ritual is invasive and scary for a young woman who’s never been naked in front of others before and who has no knowledge of her own body, but the author presents the attendant’s feelings as facts, rather than showing that it’s her interpretation of what she sees. And this comes across in several places in the book — Deborah makes assumptions about other’s feelings and motivations, but we have no reason to think that she’s actually right.

  • I would have liked more explanation about Deborah and her husband Eli’s financial situation, as she describes them struggling to afford the basics, and yet they spend an enormous amount of time (and, I assume, money) visiting doctors and therapists and other specialists regarding their sexual difficulties, and later, for prenatal treatment once the pregnancy becomes high-risk. I assume the families support the couple, but it would have been good to have a better understanding of where the money they spent came from.

 

Wrapping it all up:

Unorthodox is a powerful story that provides a startling look into a world that must seem utterly alien to anyone with a secular upbringing. While there are areas that could use more factual grounding and additional information, overall this book provides quite a lot of detail into what constitutes childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood in the Satmar community. It’s easy to understand how an intelligent girl who questions everything and thirsts for knowledge would feel stifled, and perhaps the most remarkable thing is that the author survived in this world for as long as she did.

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The details:

Title: Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots
Author: Deborah Feldman
Narrator: Rachel Botchan
Publisher: Simon Schuster
Publication date: October 2, 2012
Length (print): 272 pages
Length (audiobook): 10 hours, 31 minutes
Genre: Memoir
Source: Purchased

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A weekend pick-me-up, courtesy of CXG

How much depressing, horrifying, loathsome news can we take in one week? My morning routine has now become “read the paper to see what terrible new things our so-called-leader has said since yesterday”.

Don’t we all need a break? Don’t we all need a reason to smile, laugh, be a little gleeful?

Crazy Ex-Girlfriend is one of my favorite TV goodies, and while the show actually takes on serious issues, its musical numbers never leave me less than delighted. Just in time to disrupt my down mood last night, along came another new episode with TWO terrific songs that made me LOL. For realz.

For your viewing and listening please, just in case you need a mood boost too:

Without Love, You Can Save the World:

 

Fit Hot Guys Have Problems Too:

 

You’re welcome!

Shelf Control #104: The Underside of Joy

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

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Title: The Underside of Joy
Author: Seré Prince Halverson
Published: 2012
Length: 384 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

Losing a husband is virtually unbearable. Losing your children to the birth mother who abandoned them, whilst you are still grieving, is one heartbreak too far. It must not be allowed to happen …

Ella counts as her blessings her wonderful husband, two animated kids and an extended family who regard her as one of their own. Yet when her soulmate Joe tragically drowns, her life is turned upside down without warning, and she finds that the luck, which she had thought would last forever, has run out. When Joe’s beautiful ex-wife, who deserted their children three years earlier, arrives at the funeral, Ella fears the worst. And she may well be right to.

Ella discovers she must struggle with her own grief, while battling to remain with the children and the life which she loves. Questioning her own role as a mother, and trying to do what is right, all she is sure of is that she needs her family to make it through each day. Yet when pushed to the limits of love, Ella must decide whether she is, after all, the best mother for her children.

How and when I got it:

I ordered a used copy online a few years ago.

Why I want to read it:

I absolutely fell in love with this author’s marvelous 2014 novel All The Winters After, and once I finished, I just couldn’t wait to read more of her work… but sadly, I still haven’t gotten around to starting The Underside of Joy. It sounds like a great story, but potentially a heartbreaker, especially reading from the perspective of a parent.

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Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Ten books I meant to read in 2017 (but didn’t)

snowy10

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, featuring a different top 10 theme each week. This week’s topic is Ten Books We Meant to Read in 2017 But Didn’t Get To (and totally plan to get to in 2018). 

So many books, so little time. Here are the top 10 books that I really and truly had every intention of reading in 2017. Somehow, I guess life must have just gotten in the way.

1. In the Midst of Winter by Isabel Allende

2. George & Lizzie by Nancy Pearl

3. Midnight At the Bright Ideas Bookstore by Matthew Sullivan

4. The Waking Land by Callie Bates

5. The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

6. The Salt Line by Holly Goddard Jones

7. News of the World by Paulette Jiles

8. The Good People by Hannah Kent

9. Strange Weather by Joe Hill

10. Beartown by Fredrik Backman

Have you read any of these? Where do you think I should start?

If you wrote a TTT post this week, please share your link!

♥♥♥♥♥♥♥♥

Do you host a book blog meme? Do you participate in a meme that you really, really love? I’m building a Book Blog Meme Directory, and need your help! If you know of a great meme to include — or if you host one yourself — please drop me a note on my Contact page and I’ll be sure to add your info!

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The Monday Check-In ~ 1/8/2018

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

After a lovely week off, which included a trip to Universal Hollywood with my kiddos, it’s back to work for me today. Sigh.

What did I read last week?

A Treacherous Curse (Veronica Speedwell #3) by Deanna Raybourn: Such a fun way to kick off 2018! My review is here.

The Angry Tide by Winston Graham: The 7th book of the Poldark series is a real knock-out — granted, it gets a bit too bogged down in parts by politics and banking, but the human drama is intense and it has a heart-breaker of an ending. I’d planned to take a break before reading more in the series… but now I’m thinking I want to continue a whole lot sooner than originally planned.

Pop culture goodness:

My family has been obsessed with playing the Hogwarts Battle game. It’s so much fun!

Seriously, if you’re an HP fan, you have to check this game out. You’ll love it, I promise.

Fresh Catch:

Two new books this week — a graphic novel, and a book for book group:

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

A few different things while I wait on pins and needles for this coming week’s new arrivals:

I’m catching up on the last few Saga volumes before starting the newest…

… and I’m getting back to the illustrated edition of Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere, which looks beautiful.

Now playing via audiobook:

I hit pause on my current listen (below) so that I could listen to Binti instead. I read Binti last year, but need a refresher before book #3 comes out next week.

And once I finish Binti, I’ll go back to…

Unorthodox: The Scandalous Rejection of My Hasidic Roots by Deborah Feldman: I got about halfway through before this past week’s vacation, when I didn’t listen to audiobooks at all. I’m looking forward to finishing — what I’ve heard so far was really interesting.

Ongoing reads:

Book group reads:

  • Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott: My book group’s classic read! We’re reading and discussing two chapters per week, and have only a few more chapters to go.
  • Lord John and the Succubus by Diana Gabaldon: We’re starting our group read of this novella this week! Contact me if you’d like to join in.

So many books, so little time…

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Reading goals: Series to read in 2018

Another year, another chance to set reading goals… that may or may not be at all realistic. But hey, a reader can dream, right?

I’ve moved away from setting too many reading goals over the years. I don’t participate in reading challenges (other than Goodreads), because I know that I’ll just end up feeling frustrated and resentful if I tailor my reading to a list or set of “requirements”, rather than just reading whatever the hell I feel like. I’m definitely a mood reader — I want to read whatever I want, whenever I want, no deadlines or commitments!

BUT… I do have a few reading goals, chief among which is the desire to dive into several series that I’ve had my eye on for a while now.

In 2018, my priority series to read (or at least start) will be:

Old Man’s War by John Scalzi – six books, starting with Old Man’s War:

Lady Julia Grey by Deanna Raybourn – five books and a bunch of novellas, starting with Silent in the Grave:

Question for those who have read this series: What’s the suggested reading approach? Read all the novels first? Are the novellas necessary? Do they come at the end, or in between, or… ?? Help!

Newsflesh by Mira Grant – four novels and assorted shorter works, starting with Feed:

Again, looking for advice on how to proceed: Read the original trilogy, then the story collection, then the 4th novel?

October Daye by Seanan McGuire – 11 books and counting, plus short fiction too, starting with Rosemary and Rue:

Peter Grant series by Ben Aaronovitch – six novels and another on the way, starting with Rivers of London (Midnight Riot):

 

That’s it for my 2018 priority list… but wait, there’s more!

I still have my eye on a bunch of series/trilogies/what-have-you that I intend to read… eventually. Maybe some will make it into my 2018 reading pile, but then again, maybe not. It all depends on my reading mood! My will-get-to-at-some-point list of series includes:

  • Chaos Walking trilogy by Patrick Ness
  • Illuminae books by Amie Kaufman
  • Anything/everything by Tamora Pierce (by order of my beloved daughter)
  • The Last Policeman trilogy by Ben H. Winters
  • Wayward Pines books by Blake Crouch
  • Inheritance trilogy and/or Broken Earth series by N. K. Jemisin

I can’t forget to mention that I’m committed to continuing a few ongoing series as well, including:

  • The Expanse series — next up: Cibola Burns (#4)
  • Poldark series — currently on #7 (The Angry Tide), then continuing on with #8 (The Stranger From the Sea)

… and in the “don’t hold your breath” category, it would be lovely to be able to read the next books in the Outlander and A Song of Ice and Fire series, but I’m fairly certain we won’t see either one in 2018!

Are you planning to start any new series this year? If you’ve read any of the series on my “priority” list, let me know what you thought!

Top Ten (not) Tuesday: Top Ten New-To-Me Authors I Read In 2017

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, featuring a different top 10 theme each week… but I was away and missed Tuesday this week! Since I really like this topic, I thought I’d post anyway, even though I’m a few days behind schedule.

This week’s topic is Top Ten New-To-Me Authors I Read In 2017. I always love discovering new favorites — here are my top 10 for 2017:

Note: If you want to know more about any of the books mentioned here, click on the links to see my reviews.

1) Georgette Heyer: I’m SO late to the party, but I finally read my first Georgette Heyer novel, then read 3 more and stocked up on bunches to read in 2018.

2) Katherine Arden: I adored the first two books in her Winternight trilogy, The Bear and the Nightingale and The Girl in the Tower.

 

3) Sarah Gailey: The hippo books I never knew I needed! Find out more here.

4) Robert Kirkwood: I became hooked on The Walking Dead this year, first binge-watching the TV show and then binge-reading the comic series (28 volumes and counting!).

5) Jenny Colgan: Author of sweet, touching romances… both of these set in  Scotland, an added bonus.

6) Nnedi Okorafor: The Binti books are amazing, and I really enjoyed Lagoon as well.

7) Amor Towles: My book group enjoyed our discussion of Rules of Civility so much that we’re planning to read A Gentleman in Moscow next.

8) James S. A. Corey: After becoming a fan of The Expanse on Syfy, I decided to give the books a try. Three books later (Leviathan Wakes, Caliban’s War, Abaddon’s Gate), I’m definitely hooked and ready for more.

9) Robin Benway: Far From the Tree was so moving! I’d really like to read more by this author.

10) Ron Chernow: My big, crazy, unexpected reading achievement was reading Alexander Hamilton… and really enjoying it! I’d love to read Chernow’s new book about Grant too. 

What a great year for trying out new-to-me authors! I can’t wait to see who I’ll meet in 2018.

Which authors did you discover in 2017? Please leave me your link!

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