Thursday Quotables: Less Than a Treason

quotation-marks4

Welcome to Thursday Quotables! This weekly feature is the place to highlight a great quote, line, or passage discovered during your reading each week.  Whether it’s something funny, startling, gut-wrenching, or just really beautifully written, Thursday Quotables is where my favorite lines of the week will be, and you’re invited to join in!

Less Than a Treason by Dana Stabenow
(release date 5/6/2017)

I absolutely adore the incredible Kate Shugak books, an amazing mystery series set in Alaska. Check out my rave review (here) of the newest, book #21! Usually I highlight the beautiful descriptions of landscapes and wildlife from the Kate series, but this time around I thought I’d go with something else that always delights me in these books — Kate’s fondness for pop culture references. Here are two that made me giggle:

[Context: Fearless Kate and her partner Jim are being shot at while trying to sneak up on some thugs hiding out in an abandoned mine…]

Pop! Crack! and something thudded into the house.

“Milt! Somebody’s shooting at us! Do something!” There was a stumbling rumble from inside the house.

“Carmine, stay where you are!”

Jim peeked around the corner and found Kate peeking back and dropped instantly out of stealth mode. “Get back! Kate, Jesus, what’s wrong with you!”

She laughed. She actually fucking laughed. He stared at her, dumbfounded. “Help will always be given at Hogwarts to those who ask for it!”

A few chapters later, while visiting an evil old man on his deathbed for one final interrogation:

His cadaverous grin seemed permanently fixed on his face, and she clicked her fingers. “I’ve got it. You look just like one of The Gentlemen.”

For the first time since she’d walked into the room Erland looked a little disconcerted. “What?”

“Never mind. You’re probably not a Buffy fan.”

For one precious moment, Erland Bannister looked truly kerflummoxed.

What lines made you laugh, cry, or gasp this week? Do tell!

If you’d like to participate in Thursday Quotables, it’s really simple:

  • Write a Thursday Quotables post on your blog. Try to pick something from whatever you’re reading now. And please be sure to include a link back to Bookshelf Fantasies in your post (http://www.bookshelffantasies.com), if you’d be so kind!
  • Add your Thursday Quotables post link in the comments section below… and I’d love it if you’d leave a comment about my quote for this week too.
  • Be sure to visit other linked blogs to view their Thursday Quotables, and have fun!

391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1

Save

Save

Save

Save

Shelf Control #81: Zombie Spaceship Wasteland

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! Fore more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

cropped-flourish-31609_1280-e1421474289435.png

My Shelf Control pick this week is:

Title: Zombie Spaceship Wasteland
Author: Patton Oswalt
Published: 2011
Length: 191 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

Prepare yourself for a journey through the world of Patton Oswalt, one of the most creative, insightful, and hysterical voices on the entertain­ment scene today. Widely known for his roles in the films Big Fan and Ratatouille, as well as the television hit The King of Queens, Patton Oswalt—a staple of Comedy Central—has been amusing audiences for decades. Now, with Zombie Spaceship Wasteland, he offers a fascinating look into his most unusual, and lovable, mindscape.

Oswalt combines memoir with uproarious humor, from snow forts to Dungeons & Dragons to gifts from Grandma that had to be explained. He remem­bers his teen summers spent working in a movie Cineplex and his early years doing stand-up. Readers are also treated to several graphic elements, includ­ing a vampire tale for the rest of us and some greeting cards with a special touch. Then there’s the book’s centerpiece, which posits that before all young creative minds have anything to write about, they will home in on one of three story lines: zom­bies, spaceships, or wastelands.

Oswalt chose wastelands, and ever since he has been mining our society’s wasteland for perversion and excess, pop culture and fatty foods, indie rock and single-malt scotch. Zombie Spaceship Wasteland is an inventive account of the evolution of Patton Oswalt’s wildly insightful worldview, sure to indulge his legion of fans and lure many new admirers to his very entertaining “wasteland.”

How I got it:

I bought a used copy online.

When I got it:

No idea. A couple of years ago… maybe?

Why I want to read it:

I think Patton Oswalt is hilarious, and so, so talented. I’m not usually big on celebrity memoirs, but I do love a good geek-out, and this seems like it should be oodles of fun.

__________________________________

Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Take A Peek Book Review: Less Than a Treason (Kate Shugak, #21)

“Take a Peek” book reviews are short and (possibly) sweet, keeping the commentary brief and providing a little peek at what the book’s about and what I thought.

 

Synopsis:

(via Goodreads)

Kate Shugak is a native Aleut working as a private investigator in Alaska. She’s 5 foot 1 inch tall, carries a scar that runs from ear to ear across her throat and owns a half-wolf, half-husky dog named Mutt. Resourceful, strong-willed, defiant, Kate is tougher than your average heroine – and she needs to be to survive the worst the Alaskan wilds can throw at her.

Two thousand people go missing in Alaska every year. They vanish in the middle of mountain footraces, on fishing boats in the Bering Sea, on small planes in the Bush. Now a geologist known for going walkabout with his rock hammer has disappeared from the Suulutaq Mine in the Park. Was it deliberate? An accident? Foul play? Kate Shugak may be the only person who can find out.

But for the fact that Kate, too, is now among the missing…

My Thoughts:

Kate is back! Kate is back! Kate is back!

Yes, I’m excited. And yes, I loved this book!

If you’ve read my blog at all over the last couple of years, then you may know that I developed a full-on obsession for Dana Stabenow’s amazing Kate Shugak series. Kate is tough, devoted, smart, and resilient, and lives in one of the most beautiful places in the world. In the Kate Shugak series, the author serves up mystery after mystery — but really, what pulls me back for book after book is Kate herself, the “Park rats” who make up the tiny community in Niniltna, the troopers and cops and aunties and pilots who form the backbone of Kate’s world, and the richly entangled storytelling that builds up over the course of the series.

We’re now 21 books in (plus the Liam Campbell series of 4 books, which somewhat intersect with the Kate books and add yet another facet to her world). The series is still going strong. I gobbled up the previous 20 books (and the 4 Liams) in something like 18 months, and then was bereft over having to wait for Kate’s return, especially as #20 ended with a super cruel cliffhanger.

Well, now my girl is back! The mystery in #21 is standard Kate fare (mining, ore rights, missing persons); the real treat is in seeing Kate recovering from a traumatic event and reconnecting with all the various people who love her. All the old favorites are here — Bobby, Dinah, Katya, the aunties, and more — and Kate’s love interest Jim is as devoted (and hot) as ever. There are call-backs to earlier episodes, and some hair-raising action scenes, but mostly Less Than a Treason is a delight simply because we see Kate reclaiming her place in her own life and community.

Ah. I love these books, and I love the characters. This one made me so, so very happy, and I adored the ending too. I can only sit here now and hope and pray that Kate Shugak will live on in many, many, many more books. Do you hear me, Dana Stabenow??? I want more Kate, now and forever, amen.

Reading note 01 – The Kate books are full of super fun pop culture, literary, and musical references, and this one is no exception. Watch out for a selection in my Thursday Quotables post this week.

Reading note 02 – In case it’s not perfectly obvious, the books in this series do not — in my humble opinion — work as stand-alones. There’s simply too much world-building, full of rich and varied characters with unique and often complicatedly interconnected backstories, to be able to jump in with book #21! So take my advice, start at the beginning, and enjoy!

Reaidng note 03 — I’ll never get tired of Dana Stabenow’s gorgeous descriptions of Alaskan wildlife and scenery, even though she makes me mad that I’m not there right at this very moment!

_________________________________________

The details:

Title: Less Than a Treason
Author: Dana Stabenow
Publisher: Head of Zeus
Publication date: May 6, 2017
Length: 320 pages
Genre: Mystery
Source: Purchased

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Monday Check-In ~ 5/8/2017

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

What did I read last week?

The Boy on the Bridge by M. R. Carey: Done! My review is here.

Sleeping Giants by Sylvian Neuvel: A re-read via audiobook — and man, is the audio version fun! Check out my original review of this book, here.

Pop culture goodness:

I finally watched season 3 of AMC’s Turn, and posted a few thoughts here.

Fresh Catch:

Two new books this week:

I’m so excited for both of these!

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:
 

First and foremost, I can’t rest until I finish the new Kate Shugak book — #21 in the series! It just arrived on Saturday, and as of mid-afternoon Sunday, I’m at 65%. I’m sooooo happy to be back in Kate’s world!

Up next will be Brimstone by Cherie Priest, which I need to read before the library due date… and which sounds so good to me.

Now playing via audiobook:

I’m listening to Waking Gods by Sylvain Neuvel, the sequel to Sleeping Giants. And so far, it’s just as much fun as the first!

Ongoing reads:

MOBY

The end (of the book) is nigh! After over a year of reading and discussing Written in My Own Heart’s Blood by Diana Gabaldon — 2 chapters per week — we’re within sight of the final chapters.

The Time Machine by H. G. Wells: I’m reading The Time Machine using the Serial Reader app, and having about 40% left to go. I’ll wrap it up this week!

So many books, so little time…

boy1Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Book Review: The Boy on the Bridge

In the 2014 book The Girl With All the Gifts, author M. R. Carey introduced us to a terrifying world in which humanity has been overrun by “hungries” — humans turned into zombies after being infected by a virulent and unstoppable fungus. At an isolated army base in England, a military and medical crew work with a bunch of young hungries, who seem to be a different sort of species, still drawn to flesh for sustenance but able to speak, think, and feel as humans do. (If you haven’t read The Girl With All the Gifts, you need to check it out! My book review is here. The movie is worth seeing too!)

The new release The Boy on the Bridge is a prequel to The Girl With All the Gifts, set about 10 years earlier. Humanity has already been decimated by the Hungry plague, and the remaining humans in England live in a barricaded settlement called the Beacon. The Beacon sends out a team of scientists and soldiers in an armored vehicle, the Rosalind Franklin, to travel the country, collect samples, and search for some sort of cure or treatment for the plague — likely a hopeless cause.

The crew is an uneasy mix of career soldiers and geeky scientists, plus a gifted teen boy, Stephen Greaves, who is considered by most of the crewmembers to be possibly autistic, definitely odd, and generally a burden. The exception to this is Dr. Samrina Khan – Rina — who insisted on bringing Stephen along for the mission, and who acts as a surrogate mother to the boy. Stephen is brilliant, and Rina considers him to be crucial to any chance of making a scientific breakthrough.

We spend the entire book on the journey aboard Rosie, getting to know the crew as they bump along the countryside in very cramped quarters. There are rivalries and resentments, and the enormous pressure of knowing that they may be humanity’s last hope. The team is constantly in danger as well. Beyond taking samples, they venture outside of Rosie’s safety to do cullings along the way — basically, using their firepower to mow down as many hungries as possible.

The scenes of dormant hungries just standing wherever they happen to be, motionless and inert until triggered by movement or smell, are frightening and creepy. The danger is always present, and the reading experience can be almost as claustrophobic as it must be traveling inside Rosie.

I found the book to be slow at first, as it takes a while to get to know the twelve team members as individuals, and the first half or so of the book occasionally feels like one really unpleasant road trip. However, once the team encounters a group of feral children, the tension and the mystery definitely amp up. Who are these children, and where did they come from? What do they want… and can they be stopped? Meanwhile, Stephen and Rina each have secret agendas, and as the plot moves forward, their struggles become the central focus.

I spent much of the book wondering how this story would connect to The Girl With All the Gifts, and by the end, it becomes clear in a way that’s satisfying. The climax is action-packed and dramatic, and I was happy with the resolution presented in the epilogue.

I wouldn’t rate this one as high as the first book, but I did find it an enjoyable, entertaining read. Needless to say, it’s not for the squeamish — but if you enjoy a good twist on a a zombie apocalypse, check out The Boy on the Bridge.

Side note: The title doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me, and neither does the book’s synopsis as it appears on Goodreads. So ignore those, and just read the book anyway!

_________________________________________

The details:

Title: The Boy on the Bridge
Author: M. R. Carey
Publisher: Orbit
Publication date: May 2, 2017
Length: 392 pages
Genre: Horror
Source: Review copy courtesy of the publisher

Save

Save

Save

Save

TV Reaction: TURN, season 3 — random thoughts on the season & its finale

I’m a little behind the times, but I finally managed to watch the 3rd season of AMC’s TURN, the historical drama that tells the story of the spy ring that helped Washington win the Revolutionary War. I’m not going to go into too much detail about the show itself (check out my other TURN post, here), but I thought I’d go ahead and share some random thoughts I had after watching the season finale.

Probably needless to say, but THERE WILL BE SPOILERS.

01 – First of all, I’m glad I watched the season late. This way, I’d already heard that there’s a confirmed 4th and final season on the way. I’d hate to be left wondering.

02 – The core cast of characters seems to have run out of steam. Their storylines were all kind of scattered in the 3rd season. I never could make sense of what Abe was up to from episode to episode, or for that matter, where his romantic interest really was.

03 – The big bads this season were clearly Simcoe and Robert Rogers, both of whom are historical figures. Now, I assume the show is being more or less true to history by keeping them alive, but I feel like these two have morphed into some sort of superhuman boogeymen. They simply can’t be killed. It started to feel ridiculous that the countless ambushes set up to kill them inevitably fail. I mean, why even bother? It’s like watching a Marvel movie — you know they’re not going to kill Hulk or Iron Man or Captain America, so automatically there’s no actual tension. Simcoe and Rogers ended up being cartoon-like figures of evil intent, and overall I think this weakened the storytelling.

Simcoe is seemingly bullet-proof.

 

Rogers too.

04 – What’s always been phenomenal is the show’s handling of the grand historical figures like George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and John Andre. Season 3’s climax centered on Arnold’s treason, and was exciting, captivating television. Sadly, with this piece of the storytelling over and done with, I’m a little worried about how the show is going to keep season 4 as interesting.

John Andre – you’ll be missed!

05 – The hard thing about a show that’s about historical figures is when you know what history says about their fate. John Andre was truly the best character in every season of TURN. And as we know from history, the real John Andre was captured by the Americans and hanged as a spy. So there’s really no way that the show could claim to be sticking closely to historical events and not hang him, but man, what a loss in terms of character! Not to mention the fact that Peggy Shippen is also likely to be removed from the story or at most a peripheral character in season 4. Good-bye to my favorite parts of the story!

Peggy Shippen and Benedict Arnold

06 – I can’t help but feel concerned that the spy ring itself — Abe, Caleb, Ben, and Anna — end up being the murkiest part of the overall story. Their plots and motivations can be hard to track, and this season especially, none of them really stood out in any significant way. Sorry, but I just wasn’t that interested in the push/pull between Abe and his father, or Ben’s professional frustration, or Anna’s weird non-romance with Major Hewlett. And Caleb has never had much of an independent story to play out — he’s fun to watch, but I really don’t know much more than that.

07 – Oh dear, does this make it sound like I didn’t enjoy season 3? I did! But the show is supposedly first and foremost about the spy ring, and that’s not the part that truly held my attention. Give me more Washington, Arnold, Shippen, and Andre per episode, and I’d be a happy camper.

08 – Ha, did I mention my geek-out/freak-out in the final episodes, when Washington arrives at West Point accompanied by Alexander Hamilton? Not this version:

But I still found myself breaking into song when he showed up!

Alexander Hamilton. My name is Alexander Hamilton.

09 – Overall, I still consider TURN to be excellent television. It’s exciting, with a talented cast, amazing costumes and set designs, and a real eye toward making history come alive. I can’t help it that I get a little thrill whenever George Washington is in a scene (which is yet another testament to the strong casting). I wish the storyline this season had a more cohesive feel to it in regard to the Culper ring, but the Andre/Arnold/Shippen intrigue was more than enough to keep me glued to the TV for episode after episode.

The father of our country.

 

Season 4 — the final season — of TURN premieres June 17, 2017. It’s not too late to catch up on the first 3 seasons before then!

Will you be watching?

Thursday Quotables: The Boy on the Bridge

quotation-marks4

Welcome to Thursday Quotables! This weekly feature is the place to highlight a great quote, line, or passage discovered during your reading each week.  Whether it’s something funny, startling, gut-wrenching, or just really beautifully written, Thursday Quotables is where my favorite lines of the week will be, and you’re invited to join in!

The Boy on the Bridge by M. R. Carey
(release date 5/2/2017)

Last week, I went with a classic from the late 1800s. So naturally, this week just has to be zombies! I’m about 2/3 done with this new release (set in the same world as the terrific, horrifying The Girl With All the Gifts), and it’s pretty engrossing. (En-GROSS-ing. I make myself laugh). Here’s a little description from early on in the story:

Here and there in the broad valley, at every elevation and regardless of the terrain, human figures stand; their arms hanging at their sides, their heads mostly bowed at an angle on their necks. They stand up to their calves or knees in thistles, mud, bracken, water. They wear faded and ragged clothes made piebald by the rust of old bloodstains. They look for all the world like sleepwalkers about to wake up.

And that’s what they are, Khan thinks. Except that they won’t wake, ever. The human minds that once inhabited these carcases will slumber on for always. If they open their eyes, something else entirely will be looking out.

What lines made you laugh, cry, or gasp this week? Do tell!

If you’d like to participate in Thursday Quotables, it’s really simple:

  • Write a Thursday Quotables post on your blog. Try to pick something from whatever you’re reading now. And please be sure to include a link back to Bookshelf Fantasies in your post (http://www.bookshelffantasies.com), if you’d be so kind!
  • Add your Thursday Quotables post link in the comments section below… and I’d love it if you’d leave a comment about my quote for this week too.
  • Be sure to visit other linked blogs to view their Thursday Quotables, and have fun!

391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1

Save

Save

Save

Save

Shelf Control #80: Letters to the Lost

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! Fore more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

cropped-flourish-31609_1280-e1421474289435.png

My Shelf Control pick this week is:

Title: Letters to the Lost
Author: Iona Grey
Published: 2015
Length: 384 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

1943, in the ruins of Blitzed London…
Stella Thorne and Dan Rosinski meet by chance and fall in love by accident. Theirs is a reluctant, unstoppable affair in which all the odds are stacked against them: she is newly married, and he is an American bomber pilot whose chance of survival is just one in five.

… He promised to love her forever
Seventy years later Dan makes one final attempt to find the girl he has never forgotten, and sends a letter to the house where they shared a brief yet perfect happiness. But Stella has gone, and the letter is opened by Jess, a young girl hiding from problems of her own. And as Jess reads Dan’s words, she is captivated by the story of a love affair that burned so bright and dimmed too soon. Can she help Dan find Stella before it is too late?

Now forever is finally running out.

How I got it:

I bought a copy.

When I got it:

About a year ago, after a blogger friend recommended it.

Why I want to read it:

Wartime romance, lost lovers, mysterious letters… sounds perfect! I love good historical fiction, and a story about true love lost during war seems like something sure to tug the heartstrings.

__________________________________

Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

The Monday Check-In ~ 5/1/2017

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

Absolutely gorgeous weather this weekend, finally, so I was able to get back into my regular walking routine — and it feels great! I loved seeing this spot of color along the way.

And since I had an audiobook playing in my ears each time I walked, I was motivated to keep going much further than my usual route, and spent some extra time just sitting and gazing out at the ocean.

Bliss!

What did I read last week?

It’s weird to realize that despite being VERY INTO my reading this week, I didn’t write a single book review. So it goes.

Here’s what I read:

The Book Collector by Alice Thompson: I expected to love this short novel… but didn’t. There’s some interesting writing in The Book Collector, but overall I’d say it reads like someone put Rebecca and Silence of the Lambs in a blender… but maybe left out some key ingredients in order to make a truly delicious milkshake story.

Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy: Okay, here’s a funny story. I decided to start another classic via Serial Reader, and picked this Thomas Hardy novel, which I’d always meant to read. With Serial Reader, you read classics in daily installment of 10 – 15 minutes… so I started, and then I couldn’t stop! Instead of reading it in bite-size chunks over 51 days, I read all 51 pieces* in about 3 days. I really didn’t expect to find FFTMC an “un-put-down-able” read, but it absolutely was. I loved it, plain and simple.

*Weird little follow-up: I went back to my Kindle edition of this book to check on a small detail, and realized that somehow I skipped chapters 47 and 48 in my mad adventure with Serial Reader. It was probably me clicking ahead too fast, rather than a problem with the app**, but suddenly a certain story development makes a whole lot more sense. D’oh.

**Nope, it was definitely the app. I checked and double-checked. Those chapters aren’t there. The story mostly made sense without them, or I might have noticed sooner that they were missing, but still. Aaaargh.

And my DNF of the year award goes to…

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez: I tried. I really tried. I read about half of this book 20 years ago and never finished. When my book group picked it for our classic read, I thought it sounded like a great way for me to finally force myself to go back to a book I DNF’d so long ago. And the end result is a big NOPE for me. I got past the halfway mark this time around, but I was having zero fun. Call me crazy or lacking an appreciation of finer literature. I have read at least two other books by this author and loved them — but One Hundred Years of Solitude felt like chewing off my own limb. I think we can safely say that this is a book I will never finish.

Pop culture goodness:

My viewing obsession this week was Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale. I watched the three episodes so far available, and can’t wait for more!

Fresh Catch:

Quite a library haul this week: I came home with one DVD set, six graphic novels (from two different series), and two novels. Do I have time to read all of these? Maybe. But I’m excited to at least have the possibility.

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:
 

Despite all those library books, I’m first dedicating myself to finishing up two books already started:

  • The Boy on the Bridge by M. R. Carey
  • Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman
Now playing via audiobook:

I’m at about 30% of Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow, and it’s fascinating… but I’m going to take a teensy Hamil-break so I can listen to…

Sleeping Giants by Sylvain Neuvel: I read the book when it came out (review), but needed a refresher before starting the sequel, so I borrowed the audiobook from the library. So far, I’m loving it! The audiobook format fits really well with the transcript-style presentation of the story, and the multiple narrators (something I usually find annoying in audiobooks) is actually quite good in this case.

And once I finish, it’ll be back to more Hamiltonian history!

Ongoing reads:

MOBY

The end (of the book) is nigh! After over a year of reading and discussing Written in My Own Heart’s Blood by Diana Gabaldon — 2 chapters per week — we’re within sight of the final chapters.

And in serial reading… I just started a new book via Serial Reader: The Time Machine by H. G. Wells. This one is a lot shorter than some of the others I’ve read via the app (just 14 installments), so it won’t take me too long. Meanwhile, I’m going to try to stick to reading just one installment per day, rather than reading ahead as I did with FFTMC.

So many books, so little time…

boy1Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Thursday Quotables: Far From the Madding Crowd

quotation-marks4

Welcome to Thursday Quotables! This weekly feature is the place to highlight a great quote, line, or passage discovered during your reading each week.  Whether it’s something funny, startling, gut-wrenching, or just really beautifully written, Thursday Quotables is where my favorite lines of the week will be, and you’re invited to join in!

Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
(first published 1874)

Well, this caught me by surprise! I decided to start another book via the Serial Reader app, and picked Far From the Madding Crowd, a book I’ve always meant to read. With Serial Reader, you can read all sorts of classics via 10 minute installments each day… but I found myself immediately drawn into the story, so I’ve read about 10 days worth of installments in the first 2 days. I may have to give up on the incremental reading and just read the damn novel all at once!

So far, I’m especially enjoying some of the funnier descriptions, which I really didn’t expect. Here’s a small bit that I thought was pretty cute, about a young man falling in love:

His dog waited for his meals in a way so like that in which Oak waited for the girl’s presence, that the farmer was quite struck with the resemblance, felt it lowering, and would not look at the dog.

What lines made you laugh, cry, or gasp this week? Do tell!

If you’d like to participate in Thursday Quotables, it’s really simple:

  • Write a Thursday Quotables post on your blog. Try to pick something from whatever you’re reading now. And please be sure to include a link back to Bookshelf Fantasies in your post (http://www.bookshelffantasies.com), if you’d be so kind!
  • Add your Thursday Quotables post link in the comments section below… and I’d love it if you’d leave a comment about my quote for this week too.
  • Be sure to visit other linked blogs to view their Thursday Quotables, and have fun!

391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1391px-quotation_marks_svg1

Save

Save

Save

Save