The Monday Check-In ~ 7/22/2019

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

I’m away on a mini-road trip for most of this week, so my online presence will probably be pretty minimal. I’m off in search of sunnier scenery — I’ve had enough fog for one summer, thank you very much!

 

 

 

 

 

A programming note:

Since I’ll be away, there won’t be a Shelf Control post this week. Yes, I could set it up in advance. But hey, it’s a vacation week! So no, I’m not going to stress about it. Shelf Control will be back next week!

 

 

 

 

 

What did I read during the last week?

Finding Fraser by KC Dyer: A fun Outlander-flavored contemporary romance. My review is here.

Anne’s House of Dreams by L. M. Montgomery: I finished the audiobook of the 5th book in the Anne of Green Gables series. It’s quite a shift, seeing Anne as a contented wife, rather than as a young girl or a college student or a teacher. These books are consistently delightful, and the audiobook editions I’ve been listening to are so well done!

The Mother-In-Law by Sally Hepworth: A really good, twisty mystery/family drama. My review is here.

Read but not reviewed:

In the Shadow of Spindrift House by Mira Grant: I always love her writing, but in this case, I just didn’t get it. Maybe because it riffs off of Lovecraftian themes, and I’ve never read Lovecraft — in any case, I feel like the point of this story went over my head. Still creepy, but not her best.

Book group update:

We finished our group read of A Fugitive Green, an Outlander-world novella available in the Seven Stones to Stand or Fall collection. A great story, finally giving Hal and Minnie’s backstory. A must-not-miss for Outlander fans!

Fresh Catch:

Once again, I had some credits to use on Amazon, so here’s what I got:

I’ve read Thunderhead already, but needed my own copy so I can do a re-read before book #3 comes out later this year. And even though I haven’t started Illuminae yet, I know I’ll want to read the whole trilogy in one big binge, so now I’m ready!

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

Pride, Prejudice and Other Flavors by Sonali Dev: Just starting!

Now playing via audiobook:

Anne of Ingleside by L. M. Montgomery: Onward with book #6! I started this one as soon as I finished the previous, but I doubt I’ll make much progress while traveling this week. Loving this series!

Ongoing reads:

One ongoing book group read right now:

  • The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens — our current classic selection. We’re reading and discussing two chapters per week, and we’re just about at the halfway mark!

So many books, so little time…

boy1

The Monday Check-In ~ 7/15/2019

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

What did I read during the last week?

Wilder Girls by Rory Power: I had very mixed feelings about this YA horror story. (But oh, what an amazing cover!) My review is here.

Circe by Madeline Miller: Absolutely gorgeous. I adored the audiobook. My thoughts are here.

Please Send Help by Gaby Dunn & Allison Raskin: A fun, quick read. My review is here.

In children’s books:

I read Down Cut Shin Creek: The Pack Horse Librarians of Kentucky by Kathi Appelt and Jeanne Cannella Schmitzer. Once again, thanks to Hopewell’s Public Library of Life for the recommendation. It’s a perfect companion while reading The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson, reviewed here.

Fresh Catch:

I treated myself to the hardcover version of Mira Grant’s newest novella. I love the look of it!

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

Finding Fraser by KC Dyer: Hey, it’s summer, and I need a break from serious reads! The story of an Outlander fan who heads to Scotland to find her very own Jamie Fraser just checks all sorts of boxes for me.

Now playing via audiobook:

Anne’s House of Dreams by L. M. Montgomery: Back to Anne! This is the 5th book in the Anne of Green Gables series, which I am utterly adoring.

Ongoing reads:

Two ongoing book group reads at the moment:

  • A Fugitive Green by Diana Gabaldon, from the Seven Stones To Stand or Fall collection. Finishing this week!
  • The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens — our current classic selection.

So many books, so little time…

boy1

The Monday Check-In ~ 7/8/2019

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

Weekend visitors, 4th of July — it’s been a busy week!

What did I read during the last week?

The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs by Katherine Howe: A terrific follow-up to The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane. My review is here.

Hope Rides Again by Andrew Shaffer: Another great Obama/Biden action-adventure story. My review is here.

The 5th Gender by G. L. Carriger: Steamy alien fun! My review is here.

In audiobooks:

Anne of Windy Poplars by L. M. Montgomery: I’ve now listened to half the series! I’m loving these books so much. Taking a short break to listen to a few other pending titles, but then I’ll be back for book #5.

In graphic novels:

We Are Here Forever by Michelle Gish: Totally adorable aliens inhabiting an Earth after humans. (Check out the link above for Hope Rides Again for thoughts on this book too.)

Runaways, Volume 3: That Was Yesterday by Rainbow Rowell: Always good fun checking in with the Runaways.

Quiet Girl in a Noisy World: An Introvert’s Story by Debbie Tung: Ever read a book and think throughout, “hey, that’s me!”? Yup. Reading this book was exactly that. Adorable, and yet with an important kernel of truth too.

Fresh Catch:

Oooh. Doesn’t this look good?

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

Wilder Girls by Rory Power: I’ve just barely started… but I’m already intrigued!

Now playing via audiobook:

Circe by Madeline Miller: My book group’s pick for July. Loving it so far!

Ongoing reads:

Two ongoing book group reads at the moment:

  • A Fugitive Green by Diana Gabaldon, from the Seven Stones To Stand or Fall collection.
  • The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens — our current classic selection.

So many books, so little time…

boy1

Top Ten Tuesday: Top Ten Childhood Favorites (updated 2019)

Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, featuring a different top 10 theme each week.

This week’s top ten topic is Childhood Favorites  — a topic I featured back in 2013. And you know what? While I might be tempted to add another ten, there isn’t a single one of my original choices that I’d want to remove. So, once more with feeling… ten favorite books from my distant past that have absolutely influenced me as a reader…

1) Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. In early readings, I wanted to be Beth (go ahead, psychoanalyze me based on that little fact!), then envied Amy her world travels, but finally came to appreciate Jo in all her prickly glory. Pop culture references to Little Women always make me happy — like when Joey read it on Friends. Classic, in so many ways.

2) A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle. It just never gets old. Me in 2013: I’m trying to convince my 10-year-old to read it, mostly so I’ll have a good excuse for rereading it myself. 2019 update: The 10-year-old is now 16, and still hasn’t read this book. But I’ve reread it myself, so all is well.

3) From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E. L. Konigsburg. Seriously, wouldn’t you love to run away to live in a museum? This books was responsible for my mad scribblings, throughout my youth, of a whole bunch of half-written stories involving running off to exotic locations and having crazy adventures.

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9 of my top 10 childhood favorites — I can’t believe I still have all of these!

4) Knight’s Castle by Edward Eager. I read this book as a kid and loved it — but years later, all I could remember was that it was about kids entering into an imaginary world throught their toy castle in the playroom. I had no idea about the title or author and was never able to track it down, until my daughter came home with Half Magic by the same author, and something just clicked into place.

5) The Little House books by Laura Ingalls Wilder. I just adored these books as a kid, and didn’t know enough at the time to be bothered by some of the problematic elements. I loved Laura and her family, the crazy struggles for survival in harsh circumstances, and of course, the love story between Laura and Almanzo. Whoa, those blizzards! I still get cold thinking about the kids trying to get home from school during a wild snow storm. Brrrrr.

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Merry, Rose, and Christmas Tree June

6) Merry, Rose and Christmas Tree June by Doris Orgel. This story of a girl and her dolls just really stuck with me, and it wasn’t until a couple of years ago that I finally tracked down a copy. The fact that it’s illustrated by Edward Gorey just makes it even more of a win.

7) The All-of-a-Kind Family series by Sydney Taylor. My sister and I could not get enough of these books about a Jewish family living on the Lower East Side of New York in the 1920s. Inspiration for many a game of make-believe at our house — we even asked to take on dusting chores so we could play the button game. (If you’ve read the books, you’ll understand).

8) Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White. Oh, come on, admit it — you cried when you read this one, right?

9) Tall and Proud by Vian Smith. I went through a phase where I read everything I could get my hands on about horses.* The only thing better than a horse book was a book about a girl fighting a dreadful illness. So what could be better than this terrific book (out of print now, I believe) about a girl with polio who learns to walk again for the sake of her horse?

*I felt like I should only include one horse book on this list, but it was a close call — so here’s my special little shout-out to the books of Marguerite Henry, most especially, Misty of Chincoteague, Stormy: Misty’s Foal, and Mustang: Wild Spirit of the West.

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Horse books!

10) Light a Single Candle by Beverly Butler. In the same spirit as #9, this book about a girl dealing with blindness really resonated with my tween-self’s love of fictional heroines bravely battling illness, disability, or some other dramatic/tragic life event.

 

It’s really hard to stop at ten (or 10-ish, since I included extra horse books!).**

**I realize that I excluded Judy Blume’s books, which should certainly be on this list — but since I did a whole post about Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret last year (actually 2012), I figure I’m covered already.

What are your favorite books from childhood? If you did a TTT post this week, please share your link!

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The Monday Check-In ~ 7/1/2019

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

Summer may start officially in June, but when the calendar says July, that’s when I know it’s really here. So… happy July! Happy summer!

What did I read during the last week?

Meet Me at the Cupcake Café by Jenny Colgan: Like all books by this author, sweet and yummy! My review is here.

Cannabis: The Illegalization of Weed in America by Box Brown: Interesting, entertaining, eye-opening graphic novel exploring the history of cannabis’s legal status in the US –and (not surprisingly) how much of the outrage over cannabis was tied to racism and lies.

In children’s books:

I read That Book Woman by Heather Henson, a picture book about the Depression-era Pack Horse Librarians of the Appalachian region. A couple of weeks ago, I reviewed The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek, a novel about one such “book woman” (excellent read!), and then learned about this children’s book and other related topics from Hopewell’s Public Library of Life. Check out her post to learn more!

Fresh Catch:

And just as I was reading one Jenny Colgan book, another new one came in the mail!

Meanwhile, I was out of town when an author I love visited my favorite local bookstore, but they were kind enough to get me a signed copy of her latest anyway:

And while I was there picking up my book, well… let’s just say I have no resistance to the almighty temptation of BOOKS.

So I bought these too:

And also these:

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

The Daughters of Temperance Hobbs by Katherine Howe: A sequel to the bewitching (ha!) The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane. I’m getting close to the end — watch for my review in the next few days.

Now playing via audiobook:

Anne of Windy Poplars by L. M. Montgomery: Continuing my Anne adventures!

Ongoing reads:

Two ongoing book group reads at the moment:

  • A Fugitive Green by Diana Gabaldon, from the Seven Stones To Stand or Fall collection.
  • The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens — our current classic selection.

So many books, so little time…

boy1

Shelf Control #172: Gone-Away Lake by Elizabeth Enright

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Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

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Title: Gone-Away Lake
Author: Elizabeth Enright
Published: 1957
Length: 256 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

Summer has a magic all its own.

When Portia sets out for a visit with her cousin Julian, she expects fun and adventure, but of the usual kind: exploring in the woods near Julian’s house, collecting stones and bugs, playing games throughout the long, lazy days.

But this summer is different.

On their first day exploring, Portia and Julian discover an enormous boulder with a mysterious message, a swamp choked with reeds and quicksand, and on the far side of the swamp…a ghost town.

Once upon a time the swamp was a splendid lake, and the fallen houses along its shore an elegant resort community. But though the lake is long gone and the resort faded away, the houses still hold a secret life: two people who have never left Gone-Away…and who can tell the story of what happened there.

How and when I got it:

I picked it up at a library sale (of course)!

Why I want to read it:

Yet another children’s classic that completely passed me by. I’ve heard about Gone-Away Lake over the years, and have heard people speak fondly of it and how much they loved it as kids… but I don’t recall ever encountering this book during my childhood. It sounds pretty charming!

What do you think? Would you read this book?

Please share your thoughts!

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Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

Great American Read challenge update: Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

Reason five billion and eleven (approximately) to love my book group: Because this year, we’re doing a reading challenge based on PBS’s Great American Read — and I’m loving the books I’ve read for it.

For our challenge, we each put together a list of five books (from the list of 100) that we hadn’t read yet, and committed to reading them (or possibly alternates) during 2019. It’s a choose-your-own approach to a reading challenge, and while I don’t usually jump on the challenge bandwagon, this one is low-key enough (and with enough options and room for mind-changing) that I decided to go for it.

My newest read — finished in one sitting on a long flight — is…

 

Hatchet by Gary Paulsen
Published 1986

Synopsis:

Brian is on his way to Canada to visit his estranged father when the pilot of his small prop plane suffers a heart attack. Brian is forced to crash-land the plane in a lake–and finds himself stranded in the remote Canadian wilderness with only his clothing and the hatchet his mother gave him as a present before his departure.

Brian had been distraught over his parents’ impending divorce and the secret he carries about his mother, but now he is truly desolate and alone. Exhausted, terrified, and hungry, Brian struggles to find food and make a shelter for himself. He has no special knowledge of the woods, and he must find a new kind of awareness and patience as he meets each day’s challenges. Is the water safe to drink? Are the berries he finds poisonous?

Slowly, Brian learns to turn adversity to his advantage–an invading porcupine unexpectedly shows him how to make fire, a devastating tornado shows him how to retrieve supplies from the submerged airplane. Most of all, Brian leaves behind the self-pity he has felt about his predicament as he summons the courage to stay alive.

A story of survival and of transformation, this riveting book has sparked many a reader’s interest in venturing into the wild.

I do love a good survival story, and this one is terrific. Brian is a 13-year-old dealing with his anger and sadness over his parents’ divorce. He may think he’s dealt with traumatic events, but those are nothing compared to what he faces when his plane crashes and he’s forced to face the reality of being alone in the wilderness. He has no idea where he is, although he suspects that the plane veered off-course when the pilot’s heart attack struck. Brian realizes that rescue teams wouldn’t know where to search, and that he may be on his own for quite some time. He can give up, or he can find a way to survive.

Based on his own inner strength, as well as lessons learned from his parents, his reading, and his teachers, Brian finds a way to dig deep, face the immediate dangers of his situation, and find a way to live. With only the clothes on his back and his hatchet, Brian teaches himself to observe, learn, and use the resources around him to get food, make a shelter, and live through each day.

I really enjoyed reading Hatchet. I’d bought a copy several years ago, hoping the subject matter would inspire my son to pick up a book. It didn’t — but it was great to find the copy and finally read it myself.

After finishing the book, I went on Goodreads to learn more, and saw that there are four more books about Brian. Hatchet feels like a standalone (and was probably written that way originally), but I’m curious about the sequels. Have you read any of the other books about Brian? If so, do you recommend them?

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As for my Great American Read challenge, so far I’ve read:

  1. Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery
  2. Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
  3. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

(My reaction to the first two books: here)

From my original target list of five, I’ve yet to read:

  1. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  2. Foundation by Isaac Asimov

This is fun! I’m having a blast discovering books I probably should have read years ago… and it’s nice to have these books to weave into my reading life, in between all the new books and ARCs staring me in the face constantly.

Have you read many of the Great American Read books? Which do you consider must-reads?

Please share your thoughts!

A children’s classics two-fer: Celebrating Anne (with an E) and the glory of great dogs

We all have gaps in our reading. Classics we never were exposed to, great works that didn’t appeal, kids’ books that just didn’t come our way as children. And while I know reading EVERYTHING is an impossible dream, there are definitely children’s classics that it seems like everyone has read but me.

Of the two I finally read, one had been on my radar for years, and one was a more recent addition to my TBR. This year, my book group decided to do a reading challenge inspired by PBS’s Great American Read, where we each put together a list of five books (from the list of 100) that we hadn’t read yet, and committed to reading them (or possibly alternates) during 2019. A pretty low-pressure challenge — which is my kind of challenge!

My list of five that I committed to in January:

  1. Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery
  2. Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
  3. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  4. Foundation by Isaac Asimov
  5. Hatchet by Gary Paulsen

As of this week, I’ve read two of my five! So I thought I’d share some thoughts and reactions.

First off, I read Anne of Green Gables (originally published 1908) earlier this month… and adored it.

As soon as Anne Shirley arrives at the snug white farmhouse called Green Gables, she is sure she wants to stay forever . . . but will the Cuthberts send her back to to the orphanage? Anne knows she’s not what they expected—a skinny girl with fiery red hair and a temper to match. If only she can convince them to let her stay, she’ll try very hard not to keep rushing headlong into scrapes and blurting out the first thing that comes to her mind. Anne is not like anyone else, the Cuthberts agree; she is special—a girl with an enormous imagination. This orphan girl dreams of the day when she can call herself Anne of Green Gables.

Finally, I understand why so many people are passionately devoted to Anne! What a lovely, entertaining, charming story. Anne herself is a delightful character, full of curiosity, imagination, and a gift for inspiring those around her. I loved this journey from 11-year-old girl to a more mature young woman at the start of her teaching career. The writing is absolutely winning, especially Anne’s long monologues and flights of fancy.

A few choice (brief) bits:

“Will you ever have any sense, Anne?” groaned Marilla. “Oh, yes, I think I will, Marilla,” returned Anne optimistically. A good cry, indulged in the grateful solitude of the east gable, had soothed her nerves and restored her to her wonted cheerfulness. “I think my prospects of becoming sensible are brighter now than ever.”

 

“Don’t be very frightened, Marilla. I was walking the ridgepole and I fell off. I expect I have sprained my ankle. But, Marilla, I might have broken my neck. Let us look on the bright side of things.”

 

“I’m so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers. It would be terrible if we just skipped from September to November, wouldn’t it?”

Consider me a new-found fan! I will definitely be continuing with the Anne series. I’m hooked!

Next, I read Where the Red Fern Grows (originally published 1961).

For fans of Old Yeller and Shiloh, Where the Red Fern Grows is a beloved classic that captures the powerful bond between man and man’s best friend.

Billy has long dreamt of owning not one, but two dogs. So when he’s finally able to save up enough money for two pups to call his own—Old Dan and Little Ann—he’s ecstatic. It’s true that times are tough, but together they’ll roam the hills of the Ozarks.

Soon Billy and his hounds become the finest hunting team in the valley. Stories of their great achievements spread throughout the region, and the combination of Old Dan’s brawn, Little Ann’s brains, and Billy’s sheer will seems unbeatable. But tragedy awaits these determined hunters—now friends—and Billy learns that hope can grow out of despair.

This is a sweet story about a boy and his dogs — which, granted, probably would not be published without controversy today, but given its time and place, is a powerful and often uplifting read.

There’s an emphasis on loyalty and devotion to family, and Billy and his family epitomize a commitment to living a good life despite harsh times and limited means. Billy works for everything he gets, including his beloved dogs, and his family supports him every step of the way. Little Ann and Old Dan are the quintessential good dogs, perfectly devoted to one another and to Billy.

Yes, I could have done without the hunting for sure. And yes, that’s a big part of the story. But I can’t get too hung up on it either. I appreciate this book for what it is, focusing on the love between Billy and the dogs. It’s quite lovely in parts, and there’s something very quaint and moving about seeing the world through Billy’s innocent eyes.

(There’s also more religion and prayer than I’d normally appreciate — but again, this is part of Billy’s character and belief system, so ultimately I’m okay with it.)

I wonder whether today’s generation of kids would find anything here to relate to. Much as the Little House books are still loved despite their more problematic aspects, I’d imagine that there’s still a place in children’s literature for books like Where the Red Fern Grows. I’m glad I read it! Despite the pieces of the subject matter that don’t appeal to me as a person, I really did love the beauty of seeing the world from Billy’s perspective and the beauty of the relationships between the family members and between the people and animals.

I’m so glad I read both of these books! And while I’m overloaded with new and upcoming releases at the moment, I’m really excited about reading more from my challenge list as well.

Shelf Control #108: Wonder

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

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Title: Wonder
Author: R. J. Palacio
Published: 2012
Length: 316 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

‘My name is August.
I won’t describe to you what I look like.
Whatever you’re thinking, it’s probably worse.’

Ten-year-old August Pullman wants to be ordinary. He does ordinary things. He eats ice-cream. He plays on his Xbox. He feels ordinary – inside.

But Auggie is far from ordinary. Born with a terrible facial abnormality, he has been home-schooled by his parents his entire life, in an attempt to protect him from the cruelty of the outside world. Now, Auggie’s parents are sending him to a real school. Can he convince his new classmates that he’s just like them, underneath it all?

Narrated by Auggie and the people around him whose lives he touches, Wonder is a frank, funny, astonishingly moving debut to be read in one sitting, pass on to others, and remember long after the final page.

How and when I got it:

I bought it… years ago.

Why I want to read it:

I know, I know… absolutely everyone has read this book, and it’s supposed to be amazing! There’s no good reason why I haven’t yet, except, well, I just haven’t gotten around to it. I’m determined to finally make time to read Wonder this year, and then I’ll watch the movie. I’m not made of stone, people — of course I’ll read this book!

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Want to participate in Shelf Control? Here’s how:

  • Write a blog post about a book that you own that you haven’t read yet.
  • Add your link in the comments!
  • If you’d be so kind, I’d appreciate a link back from your own post.
  • Check out other posts, and…

Have fun!

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Top Ten Tuesday: Ten books I loved reading with my kiddos

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Top Ten Tuesday is a meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish, featuring a new top 10 theme each week. While the “official” topic is slightly different, I thought I’d focus on books that I loved reading with my kids. Now, bear in mind that both (sadly) have outgrown the reading-aloud phase, but I did diligently read to both of them every single day from infancy onward.

First, here are some books that were perfect for my sweeties in the baby and toddler days:

1. Big Red Barn by Margaret Wise Brown — so perfectly sweet.

2. ALL books by Sandra Boynton: I especially loved The Going to Bed Book, But Not the Hippopotamus, Moo Baa La La La — but they’re really all terrific. And years later, I can (and do) still quote them by heart!

3. The poetry of Winnie the Pooh: A good friend gave me a beautiful set of the Winnie the Pooh books when my daughter was born, and what we ended up especially loving were the poems in the books. Lines and Squares is amazing!

4. Richard Scarry’s Cars and Trucks from A to Z: You haven’t lived until you’ve read this book with a 2-year-old! The adults in the house were on the floor completely incapacitated by laughter the first time we read this with my son, who tried his best, in his adorable 2-year-old voice, to repeat the names of all of the very silly cars. (The 2-year-old is now 15 and I’m sure would deny having any part in this, but I have video proof!)

5. Tumble Tower – a wonderful picture book that we loved to pieces.

6. Tumble Bumble – Unrelated to Tumble Tower, it’s just such a wonderful sing-songy read, and so much fun.

As the kiddos got older, we moved on to chapter books and book series, and here are some we loved:

7. Harry Potter — of course! I read the entire series out loud to my son when he was about 7 or 8. I was so proud of myself! (He loved it too.) We had such a good time with reading and discussing these books — it was an amazing experience.

8. The Hobbit — another fun read-aloud.

9. The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman – I read this one with my daughter. She was definitely old enough to read it on her own, but the concepts involved are pretty complex, and it was a good choice for a book to share.

10. The Enchanted Forest Chronicles by Patricia C. Wrede — The dragon and princess trope turns upside down in these magical tales. Book #1 is really the best, but all make for a great shared read.

What books did you love reading with the kids in your life… or which would you want to read with your future kids? Please leave me your link!

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Do you host a book blog meme? Do you participate in a meme that you really, really love? I’m building a Book Blog Meme Directory, and need your help! If you know of a great meme to include — or if you host one yourself — please drop me a note on my Contact page and I’ll be sure to add your info!

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