Insta-Reaction: Outlander, Season 4, Episode 13 (SEASON FINALE!)

Season 4 is here! My intention is to write an “Insta-Reaction” post for each episode soon after viewing, to share some initial thoughts, questions, reactions — you name it.

Warning:

Spoilers

I may be talking about events from this episode, other episodes, and/or the book series… so if you’d rather not know, now’s your chance to walk away!

Outlander, episode 413: “Man of Worth”

The official synopsis (via Starz):

Jamie, Claire and Young Ian’s attempt to rescue Roger from his Mohawk captors goes awry when a ghost from Claire’s past lays waste to their plan. Meanwhile, Brianna worries Claire, Jamie and Roger might not return.

My take:

Major plot points:

  • Jamie, Claire, and Ian find the Mohawk camp where Roger is being held. Negotiations for his release don’t go well.
  • Claire’s opal upsets the Mohawk. A woman from the tribe shares the story of Otter Tooth.
  • Rescue plans are foiled. Eventually, Ian agrees to stay with the tribe in exchange for Roger’s freedom.
  • Brianna gives birth to a son.
  • Murtagh and Jocasta get busy. Oh my.
  • Everyone gets reunited in the end.

Insta-reaction:

I don’t know exactly why, but I was left feeling a little let down by the season finale. Maybe it’s just knowing that it’s the end of the season, and I’m already going into Droughlander shock. In any case, here’s what happened this episode.

Claire, Jamie, and Ian find the Mohawk village and ask to trade (pots, pans, and whiskey) for Roger. They seem to be making progress until someone spots the opal around Claire’s neck, which freaks everyone out. The trio is ordered to leave. Later, a woman from the tribe tells them the story of Otter Tooth, the man whose skull Claire found earlier this season. He showed up a few decades earlier and tried to convince the tribe to go to war against the white people and kill them all, in order to prevent their tribes from being wiped out in the future. No one believed him, and eventually his ravings were too upsetting, so he was killed. The woman offers to help them rescue Roger in exchange for the stone.

The rescue does not go as planned, and they’re caught. The woman ends up being banished by the tribe, and Jamie, Claire, and Ian are ordered to leave. The Mohawk will not release Roger, as no trade was completed. Jamie offers himself in exchange for Roger — but then Ian jumps in and makes his own bargain. Ian (and Rollo!) will stay and become part of the tribe, and Jamie and Claire are free to leave with Roger. Lots of tears at the good-bye!

Roger is naturally extremely pissed at Jamie, when all is said and done, and once they’re away from the village, he gives Jamie a very one-sided beat-down, since Jamie decides to take it as his punishment for beating up Roger and selling him in the first place. Once all the beating stops, Claire tells Roger what’s happened with Brianna — that’s she safe, but that she was raped after he left her, and that she’s about to have a baby, which may or may not be his. It’s a lot to take in, and Roger wants time to think. Jamie starts to get angry with Roger over his need to take a minute, but Claire basically snaps at Jamie to back the hell off. I mean, poor Roger has been to hell and back. Give him a second to breathe. Even though he really shouldn’t be hesitating for a second, but okay, let’s give Roger this moment to clear his tortured brain.

Back at River Run, Brianna is sad a lot. Then she has a baby. Then all of a sudden, the baby is two months old and Claire and Jamie arrive, but Brianna is heartbroken to realize that Roger isn’t with them. They prepare to return to Fraser’s Ridge. At the last moment, Bree sees a rider approaching and realizes it’s Roger! She runs across the lawn to him and they have a big, dramatic embrace. Roger asks her to take him to see his son. Awwwww.

Meanwhile, earlier in the episode, Murtagh and Jocasta argued and argued, she threw her drink at him… and they ended up in bed. Murtagh is quite the silver fox, amiright? Yowza. Let’s see if these two crazy lovebirds can make it work.

Maybe not, because the episode ends with redcoats arriving with an order for Jamie from the Governor: Form a militia to put down the Regulators, and find and kill their leader, Murtagh Fitzgibbons.

AND… fade to black! Bye-bye, season 4 of Outlander!

Insta-reaction wrap-up:

Jamie and Claire have been absent or underused during the last set of episodes this season, and while they do play a role in this final episode, it’s not much, and definitely not enough. Their screen time seems to be shortened lately to make room for Roger and Brianna, and I get that there needs to be a balance, but I think it’s tipped too far over to the non-Jamie and Claire side. Their moments this episode were powerful, but just too short. Jamie in particular only really had one truly strong emotional beat, in his good-bye to Ian (sob), but I didn’t care for his scene with Roger.

The Roger punching Jamie in the face bit wasn’t fun to watch, and didn’t feel true to the character. I get that Roger has a lot of rage and frustration to deal with, but by this point he’s heard the story of why Jamie did what he did. On top of that, Roger isn’t a fighter — he’s a history professor, for heaven’s sake, and isn’t someone who ever has had to use his fists to express his feelings. Roger is much more a man of peace and reason, so I just didn’t dig this scene at all.

Young Ian seems happy where he is, and seems to be excited about the new adventure ahead of him. In the book, one of the attractions for him was that he’d already fallen for a girl from the tribe and wanted a life with her. I wonder if we’ll see him at all in season 5? As far as I recall, Young Ian isn’t in book #5, but I suppose they could easily find a reason to have him show up for a visit if they wanted to.

I was really frustrated by the end of the episode. Why end with the Regulators business, the absolutely least interesting aspect of season 4? I get that they’re trying to set up the central conflict for the next season, but it just was not satisfying.

My preferred ending would have been Roger and Brianna holding the baby, with Roger naming the boy and claiming him as his own. It’s not enough that we see him telling Bree to take him to his son — after all the turbulence in their relationship and all the pain and suffering, we needed the pay-off of seeing the family together, with Brianna and Roger united and ready to start a new chapter. Wouldn’t that have been lovely?

And furthermore…

Overall, it’s been a good, strong season, despite the show moving the central storyline away from solely focusing on Jamie and Claire. There were some lovely moments along the way for the two of them, and it was nice to be able to spend time with Lord John and Murtagh again, as well as introducing teen Willie and Aunt Jocasta.

Now we start the waiting game again! Here’s hoping that season five comes along before the end of 2019!

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Insta-Reaction: Outlander, Season 4, Episode 12

Season 4 is here! My intention is to write an “Insta-Reaction” post for each episode soon after viewing, to share some initial thoughts, questions, reactions — you name it.

Warning:

Spoilers

I may be talking about events from this episode, other episodes, and/or the book series… so if you’d rather not know, now’s your chance to walk away!

Outlander, episode 412: “Providence”

The official synopsis (via Starz):

Brianna confronts a violent figure from her past in an attempt to cope with her trauma. Roger befriends a fellow captive and endeavors to escape the Mohawk Village, while Fergus and Marsali plan a dangerous mission.

My take:

Major plot points:

  • Roger suffers. Poor Roger!
  • Seriously, this episode is about 90% Roger, and I’m not complaining.
  • Roger deals with life as a Mohawk prisoner, and tortures himself over all the idiotic ways he acted in pursuit of Brianna.
  • Brianna goes to see Stephen Bonnet in prison where he awaits execution.
  • The Regulators break Murtagh out of jail.

Insta-reaction:

Roger — actor Richard Rankin — owns this episode, and kills it. Yes, other stuff happens too, but at its heart, this episode is the Roger show. Breaking it all down:

Roger has arrived at the Mohawk village in New York (and wow, that’s a long way to walk from North Carolina!) Because he fails to make it all the way through the gauntlet before collapsing, he’s informed that he remains their captive. Would he have been freed otherwise? Unclear. In any case, Roger is wounded, with his arm in a sling and all sorts of cuts and bruises on his face, and is basically put to work as a servant in the camp.

A nice Mohawk woman offers him some herbs to ease his pain, but no one else seems to want to interact with him except to yell or push him around. Eventually, he does something to piss people off (pointing and interrupting, apparently), and gets put in a leafy shack that seems to be the Mohawk equivalent of a jail cell. There, he meets Father Ferigault, a Catholic priest who the Mohawk welcomed — but he fell in love with a woman from the tribe and had a baby with her, and now he refuses to baptize the baby as the tribe wishes. He won’t baptize the baby because he considers himself a sinner, but the Mohawk see this as an insult to the tribe and have threatened to kill him unless he performs the sacrament. Roger tries to convince him to give them what they want in order to save his own life, but he refuses.

Roger finds a way to escape and starts running off through the wood, but his damned sense of honor won’t let him run when he can hear the screams of the priest, who’s being held over a fire, where he’ll slowly burn to death. He runs back to the village and hurls a cask of alcohol on the pyre, setting the priest fully on fire so he can die more quickly. The priest’s lover kisses her baby good-bye and then walks into the fire to die with him.

That’s the bulk of the episode, but additionally, we spend some time with Brianna, Lord John, Fergus and Marsali.

Fergus and the Regulators have decided to bust Murtagh out. Not really worth going into the details. Suffice to say, the jail break works, and Marsali drives the getaway horse and cart, with Murtagh hidden in the back, headed for Fraser’s Ridge.

Brianna asks Lord John to take her to WIlmington to see Stephen Bonnet. She reads Jamie’s letter to her, encouraging her to seek forgiveness rather than vengeance, for her own well-being. For Brianna, this means going to see Bonnet in prison, chained up, on the eve of his execution. She tells him about the baby, saying that her way of forgiving him is to give him the peace of knowing that some part of him will live on after his death — although she also stresses that this is HER baby, and he’ll never know a thing about Bonnet. Okay, Bree, so your point is??? I’m not a big fan of this scene, either in the book or the show. Surely there are better ways for Brianna to heal than to go and talk with her rapist, who is not the least bit repentant. And why give this man a piece of information that may come back to haunt her? Brianna believes it’s safe to tell Bonnet about the baby because he’s about to die, but this is a man who’s escaped death sentences before — and as we see at the end of the jail break, it would appear that he got away yet again.

No Jamie and Claire this episode! We get just the briefest bit of Jamie as Brianna reads his letter to her, but that’s it.

Insta-reaction wrap-up:

Any episode without Jamie and Claire feels incomplete to me. Let’s face it — they’re the true reasons we watch this show, and their story is always the most compelling. As in the books, as the story progresses, Roger and Brianna become much more prominent, but particularly on TV, losing Jamie and Claire screen time does not feel like a satisfying trade-off.

Lord John is always a delight. He’s such an upright, honest, and devoted man. I love how his feelings for Jamie and Claire have translated so easily into caring for and protecting Brianna. He’s the perfect gentleman, truly. And I suppose it’s a plus that his status as a Lord helps open doors for Brianna that might have otherwise been closed. Still, it feels like a needless move on Brianna’s part to travel (pregnant!) to Wilmington to confront Bonnet. Why not just practice forgiveness from a distance?

The Regulators storyline continues to be my least favorite part of the season. Just not engaging at all — give me the human drama any day. That said, here’s hoping that the jailbreak will result in Marsali, Fergus, and Murtagh settling at Fraser’s Ridge. It would be nice to see the whole family together again… but first (next week), Jamie and Claire need to find Roger!

And furthermore…

It was good to get more of a view into the Mohawk village’s life, beyond Roger getting beaten up all the time. I liked the little glimpses of children playing and families gathering. If the show is trying to break away from the stereotypes of fierce Native warriors acting inscrutably, they need to give us more of this — opportunities to understand their customs, their values, and their way of life, and not just viewing them as the mean people doing bad things to Roger.

Next week is the season finale! It’s all gone by so quickly. I know what’s coming (according to the book), but can’t wait to see the drama and excitement on the screen.

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Insta-Reaction: Outlander, Season 4, Episode 6

Season 4 is here! My intention is to write an “Insta-Reaction” post for each episode soon after viewing, to share some initial thoughts, questions, reactions — you name it.

Warning:

Spoilers

I may be talking about events from this episode, other episodes, and/or the book series… so if you’d rather not know, now’s your chance to walk away!

Outlander, episode 406: “Blood of My Blood”

The official synopsis (via Starz):

Jamie and Claire are surprised when Lord John Grey drops in on Fraser’s Ridge with an unexpected traveling companion. When Grey takes ill, Claire must reconcile her personal feelings with her duties as a doctor.

My take:

Major plot points:

  • Guests come calling at Fraser’s Ridge! It’s Lord John and Willie — that would be young William, Jamie’s illegitimate son.
  • Dinner conversation gets awkward. Murtagh and Lord John do not see eye to eye.
  • Lord John comes down with measles. Jamie takes William out camping while John is contagious.
  • Claire tends to John, and the two have some intense conversations.
  • Jamie and William come close to getting killed by Cherokees.
  • Everyone is okay in the end!
  • Jamie gives Claire a new silver ring to replace the one stolen by Stephen Bonnet. Claire likes it.
  • Jamie and Claire get a little quality alone time together.

Insta-reaction:

Episode 406, “Blood of My Blood” — a lot of intense relationship drama, but an odd confrontation with a group of Cherokees threw me off kilter a bit.

It was sweet seeing John and Jamie greet each other after all these years. A little bit awkward too — what, no hug? Apparently, the two old friends/former warden and prisoner have been corresponding regularly, since John knew about Jamie’s new home on Fraser’s Ridge, and apparently knew that Claire had returned from wherever she was for 20 years. (THE FUTURE, John — she was in the FUTURE.)

William introduces himself to Jamie, but later realizes that this man is actually Mac, the former groom from Helwater who taught him to ride and was so important to him. He questions Jamie about why he didn’t say so in the first place. Jamie doesn’t have a good answer for this. Question: Is this the same young actor who played season 3 William? There’s a similar look, but this one looks a lot older (as he should).

[Answer (thanks, IMDb!) – no, it’s not the same actor, but they do look alike! Season 3 Willie is played by Clark Butler, and season 4 William (he’s grown up now, thank you very much) is played by Oliver Finnegan.

Season 3

Season 4

Murtagh is still visiting at Fraser’s Ridge, although he needs to get back to town to work at his smithy and also be a rabble-rousing Regulator. He and John square off over dinner over loyalty to Governor Tryon and the British government versus exploitation of the common folk. Needless to say, they do not see eye to eye. Later, Murtagh learns that William is actually Jamie’s son.

When John becomes ill, Claire worries that William may have been infected as well. She and Jamie are both immune — Jamie since he had measles as a child, and Claire thanks to being innoculated (yay, 20th century medicine!). The contagious period lasts six days, so Claire puts John to bed where she can care for him, and Jamie sets out to ride around the wilderness with William until the six days have passed. William is not down with this plan, and kicks up a fuss until Jamie picks him up and basically throws him on a horse. Nice parenting, Jamie.

Claire and John are a little prickly with one another. Well, Claire is the most prickly. John is mostly just desperately feverish and miserable. Claire pushes John to admit why he really came to Fraser’s Ridge, since it wasn’t really on his way. Was it to rub her face in his shared past with Jamie? Was he trying to make her jealous? No, really, it turns out that John’s wife Isobel died recently, and John was saddened to realize that he felt nothing. He needed to come see Jamie to find out if he could still feel anything at all. Turns out, yes, he could.

Claire and John finally understand one another, and end up offering one another an odd sort of friendship and respect.

Meanwhile, Jamie and William have a pretty good time out in the woods, where William learns to fish the Highlander way, shoots a deer and guts it himself, and spends some manly time with his bio dad. But when William crosses the boundary line into Cherokee territory, of course a group of Cherokee come along right then and threaten to kill one or both of them. William protects Jamie after Jamie tries to protect William, and the Cherokee, respecting William’s bravery, end up leaving without any murder happening.

Jamie and William return to the cabin to find a recovered John, and by the time John and William leave, William’s connection to Jamie has been reestablished. They share a final look as William rides away, not knowing when or if they’ll see each other again.

Later, Jamie and Claire are finally alone (since Ian is out on a hunting trip with some Cherokee friends). Jamie gives Claire a bath, then presents her with a new silver ring with a thistle-pattern design, made from his mother’s silver candlestick. Inside the ring is the inscription “da mi basia mille” — give me a thousand kisses. It’s a sweet, romantic moment, and leads to some sexy post-bath fireside love. These two… It’s nice to see that they’ve still got it!

The ring!!!

Insta-reaction wrap-up:

I could have done without the Cherokee scene this episode. It wasn’t at all necessary, other than to show Jamie declaring William to be his son in an effort to convince the Cherokee to kill him instead of William. Were they really going to kill William over a fish that he handed right back to them? Really? And are these different Cherokee than the ones Jamie established a friendship with and Ian is now spending time with? It was sweet that William threw himself in front of Jamie to save him, but the whole thing felt contrived to me, and I’m not particularly comfortable with scenes like this that show the Cherokee being unreasonably violent and murderous. Just seemed out of place, in my humble opinion.

Ha, this episode included the mother of awkward conversations. In his feverish delirium, John tells Claire that he could have had Jamie if he’d wanted to, when Jamie offered to repay John for adopting William by offering him his body. Claire seemed more than a little stunned by this, but where was the follow-up? John didn’t offer further explanation (although he did apologize for being offensive while sick), and we don’t see Claire asking Jamie about this. Wouldn’t you think a wife might ask her husband a few questions on the matter?

I did think it was funny when John made a point of telling Claire that he was an adequate husband to Isobel IN ALL WAYS. Um, Claire, that means that he did sleep with her. So quit acting like it was weird, even though he described his relationship with Isobel as being like brother and sister. At least William had loving parents!

And furthermore…

I liked all the little nods to favorite moments and icons from the books, including the snake in the privy in the opening shot, the resurrection of the silver ring and its inscription as described in the very first Outlander novel, and all the little bits of dialogue lifted straight from the text. It makes my bookish heart all warm and tingly to see the show honoring the source material, and makes me feel even more appreciative of the writers and showrunners for recognizing the importance of these moments.

It’s also really fun to play “spot the moment” with the images from the opening song. We’ve seen a bunch now — the arrival at River Run, the folding hands, the bath — but there are so many good ones still to come!

Can we please do something about this hair?

But a final note — can someone please give Jamie a haircut? Those fringe-y bangs are making me bonkers. Just grow them out or pull them back or something! Don’t get me wrong, Jamie can never look bad… but that hair style is doing him no favors.

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The Monday Check-In ~ 10/1/2018

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

What did I read during the last week?

Miss Kopp Just Won’t Quit by Amy Stewart: I adore this series, and the audiobook is fantastic. My review is here.

Lethal White by Robert Galbraith: Another terrific volume in the ongoing Cormoran Strike series. My review is here.

Dry by Neal Shusterman and Jarrod Shusterman: YA adventure about surviving an extreme drought. My thoughts are here.

In audiobooks, I also listened to The Turn of the Screw by Henry James, narrated by Emma Thompson (with an intro performed by Richard Armitage). I’d never read the story before, and I’m not sure it was what I’d expected… but the voice performance was excellent, and I was definitely captivated throughout.

Fresh Catch:

I treated myself to a couple of hardcover all-in-one editions of Tamora Pierce quartets:

 

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

The Sisters of the Winter Wood by Rena Rossner: A story of two sisters in a Jewish shtetl, living on the edge of forest where there are magical, fairy-tale creatures. I’m loving it so far!

Now playing via audiobook:

The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller: This has been on my to-read list for such a long time! I’ve only just started, but I have high hopes!

Ongoing reads:

Book group reads:

  • Classic read: My book group’s current classic read is Middlemarch by George Eliot.  We’re reading and discussing two chapters per week. Slow but steady!
  • The Scottish Prisoner by Diana Gabaldon. An ongoing group read, two chapters per week — we’ll be finished in December. Want to join in? Ask me how!

So many books, so little time…

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The Monday Check-In ~ 9/24/2018

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

What did I read during the last week?

The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory: Light, sexy romance — a nice change from heavier reading! My review is here.

The 7 1/2 Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton: I DNFd, then decided to give it another chance and read through to the end. Not the best decision I’ve ever made. My thoughts are here.

Evidence of the Affair by Taylor Jenkins Reid: A short story consisting of letters between a man and a woman who discover their spouses are having an affair with each other. Sweet, moving, and heart-felt.

In audiobooks:

I finished the 4th book in The Immortals quartet by Tamora Pierce. My series wrap-up post is here.

Bookish delight:

I attended a book event for the always wonderful Gail Carriger, in honor of the publication of the 10th anniversary illustrated edition of Soulless. The event was so much fun, and since it was held at one of my favorite bookstores, I felt pretty great about buying lots ‘o stuff on the way out the door.

Fresh Catch:

It’s a feast of new books! Look at all the pretties that arrived this week:

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

Lethal White by Robert Galbraith: Hurray for the public library! My hold request came in the week the book was released! It’s a BIG book (600+ pages), so I need to get cracking if I’m going to finish before the due date. (I’m about 100 pages in, and loving it so far!)

Now playing via audiobook:

Miss Kopp Just Won’t Quit by Amy Stewart: It’s the 4th Kopp Sisters book! I love these books, and this one is just as fabulous as the previous three. And the audiobook narrator is perfection.

Ongoing reads:

Book group reads:

  • Classic read: My book group’s current classic read is Middlemarch by George Eliot.  We’re reading and discussing two chapters per week. Slow but steady!
  • The Scottish Prisoner by Diana Gabaldon. An ongoing group read, two chapters per week — we’ll be finished in December. Want to join in? Ask me how!

So many books, so little time…

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The Monday Check-In ~ 9/17/2018

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

What did I read during the last week?

The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal: Definitely a favorite for 2018! Read my love-fest of a review, here.

Stay With Me by Ayobami Adebayo: My book group read for September. My review is here.

Vox by Christina Dalcher: A look at a US society in which women’s voice have literally been silenced. My review is here.

In audiobooks:

Emperor Mage by Tamora Pierce: Book #3 in The Immortals series. Excellent addition to the world of Tortall!

Pop culture goodness:

Has anyone else watched Forever on Amazon yet? It’s weird and funny and totally surprising. Maya Rudolph is just as good as you’d expect. I’ve watched half of the available episodes, and recommend checking it out! (It’s pretty low commitment for a binge-watch, just eight half-hour episodes).

Fresh Catch:

I added even more Kindle books to my never-ending TBR list, thanks to various price drops that popped up this week. Here’s a peek at my newest acquisitions:

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory: After some heavier reads, a little light-and-fluffy romance might really hit the spot.

Now playing via audiobook:

The Realms of the Gods (The Immortals, #4) by Tamora Pierce: Finishing up the Immortals quartet!

Ongoing reads:

Book group reads:

  • Classic read: My book group’s current classic read is Middlemarch by George Eliot.  We’re reading and discussing two chapters per week. Slow but steady!
  • The Scottish Prisoner by Diana Gabaldon. Continuing our group read of the Lord John works, it’s lovely to revisit The Scottish Prisoner, which stars Lord John Grey and everyone’s favorite Scottish laird, Jamie Fraser. Want to join in? Ask me how!

So many books, so little time…

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The Monday Check-In ~ 9/10/2018

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

Wishing all who celebrate a sweet and happy new year! I’m traveling for a few days, visiting family for the holidays, so this post (and all others) may be a bit choppier than usual. But, as always when I have lots of hours on airplanes, I’ve been reading my head off!

What did I read during the last week?

The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch: Creepy sci-fi with lots of timey-wimey twists. Confusing, sometimes horrifying, pretty great read.

Promised Land by Martin  Fletcher: Powerful historical fiction. My review is here.

Wolf-Speaker by Tamora Pierce: Book #2 in The Immortals series. This series gets better and better!

Fresh Catch:

No new books this week. Well, no new physical books. I’m incapable of resisting when I see a good Kindle price drop.

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal: A little bit Hidden Figures, a little bit Deep Impact (remember that movie?), even a little bit Interstellar — a whole lot of awesome. Loving this book.

Now playing via audiobook:

Emperor Mage (The Immortals, #3) by Tamora Pierce: I really love these characters. Totally enjoying the audiobook! I should be wrapping up by mid-week, and want to continue straight on with #4.

Ongoing reads:

Book group reads:

  • Classic read: My book group’s current classic read is Middlemarch by George Eliot.  We’re reading and discussing two chapters per week. Slow but steady!
  • The Scottish Prisoner by Diana Gabaldon. Continuing our group read of the Lord John works, it’s lovely to revisit The Scottish Prisoner, which stars Lord John Grey and everyone’s favorite Scottish laird, Jamie Fraser. Want to join in? Ask me how!

So many books, so little time…

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The Monday Check-In ~ 9/3/2018

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

Three-day weekends rock! It’s so nice to get that extra day to sleep in, wear pajamas past noon, and (of course) read all the books.

What did I read during the last week?

The Girl in the Green Silk Gown by Seanan McGuire: The sequel to Sparrow Hill Road, both of which have a tangential connection to the InCryptid series. My review is here.

Wild Magic by Tamora Pierce: Book # 1 in The Immortals series. Continuing my journey through the world of Tortall! I enjoyed the audiobook, once I got used to the full cast recording.

Nothing like getting a little carried away by YA love! After watching the Netflix movie last week, I decided to read To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han… and couldn’t stop until I’d read the whole trilogy! Sweet, light, and surprisingly touching. My thoughts on the book and movie are here.

Pop culture goodness:

I saw Crazy Rich Asians! Loved it, of course… and now I need to read the books.

Fresh Catch:

I had a big old Amazon credit to spend, so I treated myself to the new Harry Potter boxed set! Sooooo pretty.

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

The Gone World by Tom Sweterlitsch: Creepy and time-twisty. So close to the end — I hope to finish today.

Now playing via audiobook:

Wolf-Speaker (The Immortals, #2) by Tamora Pierce: This series is growing on me! I really like the main character, and I’m interested to see where all this leads.

Ongoing reads:

Book group reads:

  • Classic read: My book group’s current classic read is Middlemarch by George Eliot.  We’re reading and discussing two chapters per week. Slow but steady!
  • The Scottish Prisoner by Diana Gabaldon. Continuing our group read of the Lord John works, it’s lovely to revisit The Scottish Prisoner, which stars Lord John Grey and everyone’s favorite Scottish laird, Jamie Fraser. Want to join in? Ask me how!

So many books, so little time…

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The Monday Check-In ~ 8/27/2018

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

What did I read during the last week?

Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells: It’s the return of Murderbot! My review is here.

Fatal Throne (by a whole list of authors): My review of this YA take on the Tudors is here.

Competence (The Custard Protocol, #3) by Gail Carriger: I just adored the audiobook! My thoughts are here.

And a late addition — just finished over the weekend:

You Me Everything by Catherine Isaac: Sweet, heart-centered contemporary fiction. My review is here.

Pop culture goodness:

I watched the Netlix movie version of To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before — adorable! Question for all my bookish friends: Since I enjoyed the movie, should I read the book?

Fresh Catch:

I bought a business-y book. Can you believe it? I’ve made a vague commitment to a few folks at work to read this… but I have a hard time using my precious reading moments for non-pleasure reading.

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

The Girl in the Green Silk Gown by Seanan McGuire: It’s Seanan McGuire! Of course I’m going to read this book!

Now playing via audiobook:

Back to Tamora Pierce and Tortall! I’m starting The Immortals series, which begins with Wild Magic. I’m not loving the full-cast recording so far (those rarely work for me), but I’m sticking with it to see if the story itself grabs me.

Ongoing reads:

Book group reads:

  • Classic read: My book group’s current classic read is Middlemarch by George Eliot.  We’re reading and discussing two chapters per week. Slow but steady!
  • The Scottish Prisoner by Diana Gabaldon. Continuing our group read of the Lord John works, it’s lovely to revisit The Scottish Prisoner, which stars Lord John Grey and everyone’s favorite Scottish laird, Jamie Fraser. Want to join in? Ask me how!

So many books, so little time…

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The Monday Check-In ~ 8/20/2018

cooltext1850356879 My Monday tradition, including a look back and a look ahead — what I read last week, what new books came my way, and what books are keeping me busy right now. Plus a smattering of other stuff too.

Life.

It’s back-to-school day here in San Francisco — so despite what the calendar may say, in my mind, that’s the end of summer. Ah well, it was nice while it lasted! Back to the parental duties of nagging about homework, doing school drop-offs, and worrying about grades.

 

 

What did I read during the last week?

Night and Silence by Seanan McGuire: The 12th October Daye book is brilliant and powerful, demonstrating that this series is going strong even 12 books in! I’m just upset now at the idea of waiting a full year for book #13! Check out my review of Night and Silence, here.

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman: Once again, my book group’s book of the month turned out to be a terrific read! My review is here.

In children’s books…

I came across a reference to the ballad of Tam Lin in my reading this week, and realized that while I’d heard of it before, I didn’t actually know the story. Children’s books are a terrific source of fairy tale knowledge! My local library had a copy of Jane Yolen’s telling of Tam Lin, and I loved it. The story is enhanced by Charles Mikolaycak’s beautiful illustrations, and this book turned out to be exactly what I needed — much better than reading a dry synopsis on Wikipedia!

Pop culture goodness:

I watched the Netlix movie version of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society over the weekend. Just lovely! It’s been many years since I read the book… and now I’m thinking I should read it again.

Fresh Catch:

While I was at the library, I picked up a couple more books that caught my eye. Because apparently I don’t already have enough to read?

What will I be reading during the coming week?

Currently in my hands:

Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells: Murderbot is back! I’m justing starting the 3rd novella in the series, and Murderbot is as fed up with humanity as ever. Such fun.

Now playing via audiobook:

Competence (The Custard Protocol, #3) by Gail Carriger: I’m so close to the end! Loving every moment.

Ongoing reads:

Book group reads:

  • Classic read: My book group’s current classic read is Middlemarch by George Eliot.  We’re reading and discussing two chapters per week. Slow but steady!
  • The Scottish Prisoner by Diana Gabaldon. Continuing our group read of the Lord John works, it’s lovely to revisit The Scottish Prisoner, which stars Lord John Grey and everyone’s favorite Scottish laird, Jamie Fraser. Want to join in? Ask me how!

So many books, so little time…

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