Shelf Control #291: Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters

Shelves final

Welcome to Shelf Control — an original feature created and hosted by Bookshelf Fantasies.

Shelf Control is a weekly celebration of the unread books on our shelves. Pick a book you own but haven’t read, write a post about it (suggestions: include what it’s about, why you want to read it, and when you got it), and link up! For more info on what Shelf Control is all about, check out my introductory post, here.

Want to join in? Shelf Control posts go up every Wednesday. See the guidelines at the bottom of the post, and jump on board!

Title: Crocodile on the Sandbank
Author: Elizabeth Peters
Published: 1975
Length: 290 pages

What it’s about (synopsis via Goodreads):

Amelia Peabody is Elizabeth Peters’ most brilliant and best-loved creation, a thoroughly Victorian feminist who takes the stuffy world of archaeology by storm with her shocking men’s pants and no-nonsense attitude!

In this first adventure, our headstrong heroine decides to use her substantial inheritance to see the world. On her travels, she rescues a gentlewoman in distress – Evelyn Barton-Forbes – and the two become friends. The two companions continue to Egypt where they face mysteries, mummies and the redoubtable Radcliffe Emerson, an outspoken archaeologist, who doesn’t need women to help him solve mysteries — at least that’s what he thinks!

How and when I got it:

I bought a used paperback edition at least five years ago.

Why I want to read it:

I’m wracking my brain trying to remember how I first heard of this book. I feel pretty certain that it was recommended by an author I follow (Gail Carriger? Dana Stabenow?), enough to make me want to check it out.

The Goodreads reviews are really mixed, but I have a feeling that’s because the book was first published in 1975, so I’m sure the subject matter and style feel a bit dated by now. But, if you weed out the comparisons to more recent fiction, the reviews tend to be more upbeat, praising the writing, the setting, and the lead character.

I really like the sound of the plot, with mummies and Egyptologists and potential curses. While I don’t often gravitate toward mystery series (this is the 1st in a series of 20 books), this book does sound like a fun, engaging read.

What do you think? Would you read this book?

Please share your thoughts!

Literary Potpourri


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10 thoughts on “Shelf Control #291: Crocodile on the Sandbank by Elizabeth Peters

  1. What fun! I’ve read a later book in this series (only one so far) and I quite enjoyed it–the main couple are like an exaggerated version of Rick and Evelyn of the Mummy films. Hope you enjoy the book.

  2. Pingback: Shelf Control #157: Poison in Paddington by Samantha Silver – Literary Potpourri

  3. Pingback: The Last 10 Books Tag – Hundreds & Thousands of Books

      • Well, I’m not much for series, but the Australian author Tara Moss started a series last year and I’m aching to read the next one. I also enjoyed the first two Tessa Crichton books by Anne Morice that Dean Street Press has re-released. I also enjoyed the new mystery novel by Daisy Waugh, In a Crypt with a Candlestick, and I wouldn’t mind reading more of those. Beatriz Williams has this Wicked City books, but I only read the second one, and the third is coming out now – like tomorrow. I wanted to ask for the ARC but my reading list was too full. Now I’m sorry I didn’t. Her writing just sparkles! As for older ones – obviously Agatha Christie, especially her Tommy & Tuppence books.

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